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Age Moderates the Relationship between Social Support and Psychosocial Problems
Unformatted Document Text:  Age Moderates 13 support from a spouse or serious romantic partner, participants with such a partner (n = 263) were asked to also complete House and Kahn’s (1985) positive support index. The 2- item scale asks participants to respond to the following statements on 5-point Likert scales: “My spouse or romantic partner makes me feel loved and cared for,” and “My spouse or romantic partner is willing to listen to me.” This scale has been used successfully with both young and elderly populations, and is not correlated with respondents’ age (Lynch, 1998). The reliability of this scale was = .84. Contact with family and friends. The extent of contact with family members and friends was measured with items developed by Andersson (1984) that simply ask respondents to indicate how much time they spend with “friends or acquaintances” or “family members or relatives.” These were answered on 5-point Likert scales anchored at “hardly ever” to “very often.” A nonapplicable response option was also provided for cases in which the respondents had no family members or no friends. Relationship standards. Two subscales from Dykstra’s (1995) Relationship Standards measure were used to assess participants’ standards and attitudes toward relationships. The singlehood standard scale measures the perceived negative aspects of being in a close relationship (e.g., “With a partner one loses one’s identity,” and “A partner imposes restrictions on one’s life”). High scores on this subscale reflect a strong value on personal autonomy and a view of relational partners as a threat to that autonomy. The partner standard scale measures perceived positive aspects of being in a close relationship (e.g., “A partner enriches one’s life,” and “Life is empty without a partner”). High scores on this subscale reflect a view of close relational partners as vital to, and necessary for,

Authors: Segrin, Chris.
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Age Moderates
13
support from a spouse or serious romantic partner, participants with such a partner (n =
263) were asked to also complete House and Kahn’s (1985) positive support index. The 2-
item scale asks participants to respond to the following statements on 5-point Likert scales:
“My spouse or romantic partner makes me feel loved and cared for,” and “My spouse or
romantic partner is willing to listen to me.” This scale has been used successfully with both
young and elderly populations, and is not correlated with respondents’ age (Lynch, 1998).
The reliability of this scale was = .84.
Contact with family and friends. The extent of contact with family members and
friends was measured with items developed by Andersson (1984) that simply ask
respondents to indicate how much time they spend with “friends or acquaintances” or
“family members or relatives.” These were answered on 5-point Likert scales anchored at
“hardly ever” to “very often.” A nonapplicable response option was also provided for cases
in which the respondents had no family members or no friends.
Relationship standards. Two subscales from Dykstra’s (1995) Relationship
Standards measure were used to assess participants’ standards and attitudes toward
relationships. The singlehood standard scale measures the perceived negative aspects of
being in a close relationship (e.g., “With a partner one loses one’s identity,” and “A partner
imposes restrictions on one’s life”). High scores on this subscale reflect a strong value on
personal autonomy and a view of relational partners as a threat to that autonomy. The
partner standard scale measures perceived positive aspects of being in a close relationship
(e.g., “A partner enriches one’s life,” and “Life is empty without a partner”). High scores
on this subscale reflect a view of close relational partners as vital to, and necessary for,


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