All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Age Moderates the Relationship between Social Support and Psychosocial Problems
Unformatted Document Text:  Age Moderates 23 associations for depression were similar, although the married-unmarried differences were not as strong. According to socioemotional selectivity theory (Carstensen, 1992, 1993) shrinking social networks among the elderly are viewed as a result of volitional changes in interaction patterns. As people age, they are assumed to become more selective about who they interact with, showing little use for more superficial relationships. In an abstract sense, the results of this study are generally consistent with the tenants of socioemotional selectivity theory. Younger adults tended to reap the most benefits from diverse sources of social support (i.e., family, friends, and intimate partners). In contrast, the psychosocial well- being of older adults does not appear to be as closely tied to social network interactions or support. What is perplexing from the standpoint of socioemotional selectivity theory is why this was the case for social support from a partner/spouse in particular. If people zero in on their closest relationship as they enter later stages of life, one would expect their depression and loneliness to be more strongly related to social support from the partner/spouse. Although still significant, this relationship was weakest at later stages in the life span. On the bright side, weak or nonsignificant associations between social support and psychological health later in the life span indicate that shirking social networks or even loss of close relational partners need not be viewed as necessarily devastating to the elderly people’s psychological health. Evidently, many elderly people find a way to remain happy and content, despite the changing nature of their social circumstances. Relationship Standards and Psychosocial Problems over the Life Span One means by which older people’s psychosocial well-being may be maintained, regardless of available social support, is through the development of realistic and functional

Authors: Segrin, Chris.
first   previous   Page 23 of 53   next   last



background image
Age Moderates
23
associations for depression were similar, although the married-unmarried differences were
not as strong.
According to socioemotional selectivity theory (Carstensen, 1992, 1993) shrinking
social networks among the elderly are viewed as a result of volitional changes in interaction
patterns. As people age, they are assumed to become more selective about who they
interact with, showing little use for more superficial relationships. In an abstract sense, the
results of this study are generally consistent with the tenants of socioemotional selectivity
theory. Younger adults tended to reap the most benefits from diverse sources of social
support (i.e., family, friends, and intimate partners). In contrast, the psychosocial well-
being of older adults does not appear to be as closely tied to social network interactions or
support. What is perplexing from the standpoint of socioemotional selectivity theory is
why this was the case for social support from a partner/spouse in particular. If people zero
in on their closest relationship as they enter later stages of life, one would expect their
depression and loneliness to be more strongly related to social support from the
partner/spouse. Although still significant, this relationship was weakest at later stages in
the life span. On the bright side, weak or nonsignificant associations between social
support and psychological health later in the life span indicate that shirking social networks
or even loss of close relational partners need not be viewed as necessarily devastating to the
elderly people’s psychological health. Evidently, many elderly people find a way to remain
happy and content, despite the changing nature of their social circumstances.
Relationship Standards and Psychosocial Problems over the Life Span
One means by which older people’s psychosocial well-being may be maintained,
regardless of available social support, is through the development of realistic and functional


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.