All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Age Moderates the Relationship between Social Support and Psychosocial Problems
Unformatted Document Text:  Age Moderates 24 relationship standards. The theory of evolutionary psychology would predict that younger people would hold a strong partner standard that would motivate them to seek out potential mates. Socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that older adults would hold a strong partner and weak singlehood standard, as they are more focused on cultivating relationships with core members of their social support networks. Results of this study reveal that the singlehood standard (i.e., viewing partners as restricting one’s freedom and threatening one’s identity) is unassociated with age. Nevertheless, a significant age by singelhood standard interaction showed that endorsement of this standard is most strongly and negatively associated with loneliness for the younger participants. At later points in the life span, endorsement of the singlehood standard was unrelated to loneliness. For younger adults, valuing independence may be an effective means of coping with singlehood and/or establishing a self-identity. It may reflect a sense of personal autonomy and self-efficacy that protects against feelings of loneliness. However, valuing singlehood later in the life span appears to have no prophylactic effect on the development of loneliness. Analyses of the partner standard (i.e., a partner enriches one’s life and life is empty without a partner) indicated that these beliefs and attitudes increase slightly with age. It appears that as people age, they develop a greater appreciation for the value of a partner in their lives. It is plausible to assume that this may reflect learning from years of experience. Despite the fact that endorsement of the partner standard increases with age, it is the older, not the younger, participants who are apparently the least emotionally burdened by their belief in the value of a partner. At earlier ages, an appreciation of the benefits of a close partner is significantly and positively associated with loneliness. However, at later stages of the life span, this relationship disappears. The nature of this interaction is suggestive of a

Authors: Segrin, Chris.
first   previous   Page 24 of 53   next   last



background image
Age Moderates
24
relationship standards. The theory of evolutionary psychology would predict that younger
people would hold a strong partner standard that would motivate them to seek out potential
mates. Socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that older adults would hold a strong
partner and weak singlehood standard, as they are more focused on cultivating relationships
with core members of their social support networks. Results of this study reveal that the
singlehood standard (i.e., viewing partners as restricting one’s freedom and threatening
one’s identity) is unassociated with age. Nevertheless, a significant age by singelhood
standard interaction showed that endorsement of this standard is most strongly and
negatively associated with loneliness for the younger participants. At later points in the life
span, endorsement of the singlehood standard was unrelated to loneliness. For younger
adults, valuing independence may be an effective means of coping with singlehood and/or
establishing a self-identity. It may reflect a sense of personal autonomy and self-efficacy
that protects against feelings of loneliness. However, valuing singlehood later in the life
span appears to have no prophylactic effect on the development of loneliness.
Analyses of the partner standard (i.e., a partner enriches one’s life and life is empty
without a partner) indicated that these beliefs and attitudes increase slightly with age. It
appears that as people age, they develop a greater appreciation for the value of a partner in
their lives. It is plausible to assume that this may reflect learning from years of experience.
Despite the fact that endorsement of the partner standard increases with age, it is the older,
not the younger, participants who are apparently the least emotionally burdened by their
belief in the value of a partner. At earlier ages, an appreciation of the benefits of a close
partner is significantly and positively associated with loneliness. However, at later stages
of the life span, this relationship disappears. The nature of this interaction is suggestive of a


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 24 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.