All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Age Moderates the Relationship between Social Support and Psychosocial Problems
Unformatted Document Text:  Age Moderates 8 therefore predicts that younger people are more prone to pursue information acquisition from their social interactions, and that this is accomplished by interaction in a wide range of novel social encounters. As people age this goal becomes less relevant, and they focus attention on the more immediate emotional aspects of life, and shorter term gratification through meaningful interaction with a more select and rewarding group of close relational partners. There is a substantial body of empirical evidence to support the basic tenants of socioemotional selectivity theory. An analysis of 34 years of data indicated that interaction frequency with friends and acquaintances declined substantially from early adulthood into older age (Carstensen, 1992). Over the same time, interaction frequency and closeness with spouses and family members increased. Furthermore, the percentage of close partners in the social network appears to be negatively correlated with happiness among young, but not old, adults (Fung, Carstensen, & Lang, 2001). The selectivity in close relationships seems to have few ill effects for the elderly, whereas young adults’ happiness appears to be more strongly yoked to contact in greater quantity with more peripheral network members (Green, Richardson, Lago, & Schatten-Jones, 2001). It is notable that the percentage of very close network members is comparable for young and old adults (Fung et al., 2001; Lang & Carstensen, 1994). Relationship Standards over the Life Span One mechanism explored in this study to explain the possible changing role of the social support network over the life span is relationship standards. Relationship standards involve beliefs and expectations about the necessity of a close relationship for life satisfaction. The changing motivation for interaction with central versus peripheral social

Authors: Segrin, Chris.
first   previous   Page 8 of 53   next   last



background image
Age Moderates
8
therefore predicts that younger people are more prone to pursue information acquisition
from their social interactions, and that this is accomplished by interaction in a wide range of
novel social encounters. As people age this goal becomes less relevant, and they focus
attention on the more immediate emotional aspects of life, and shorter term gratification
through meaningful interaction with a more select and rewarding group of close relational
partners.
There is a substantial body of empirical evidence to support the basic tenants of
socioemotional selectivity theory. An analysis of 34 years of data indicated that interaction
frequency with friends and acquaintances declined substantially from early adulthood into
older age (Carstensen, 1992). Over the same time, interaction frequency and closeness with
spouses and family members increased. Furthermore, the percentage of close partners in
the social network appears to be negatively correlated with happiness among young, but not
old, adults (Fung, Carstensen, & Lang, 2001). The selectivity in close relationships seems
to have few ill effects for the elderly, whereas young adults’ happiness appears to be more
strongly yoked to contact in greater quantity with more peripheral network members
(Green, Richardson, Lago, & Schatten-Jones, 2001). It is notable that the percentage of
very close network members is comparable for young and old adults (Fung et al., 2001;
Lang & Carstensen, 1994).
Relationship Standards over the Life Span
One mechanism explored in this study to explain the possible changing role of the
social support network over the life span is relationship standards. Relationship standards
involve beliefs and expectations about the necessity of a close relationship for life
satisfaction. The changing motivation for interaction with central versus peripheral social


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.