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Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment

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Abstract:

The present study explored the relationship between partner attachment styles and hurtful messages. Attachment styles in addition to frequency of hurtful messages and degree of hurt were examined in 37 romantically involved couples. Based on the tenets of attachment theory, it was argued that hurtful messages are a form of insensitivity or unresponsivity (i.e., the broad category of interactions that influence the attachment relationships formed). Consequently, frequency of hurtful messages as well as degree of hurt experienced were hypothesized to be related to attachment styles. As predicted, results showed that secure tendencies were negatively related to the frequency of hurtful messages reported in the general relationship, whereas preoccupied and dismissive-avoidant tendencies were positively related with the frequency of hurtful messages. Regarding the degree of hurt reported during a specific conflict episode, secure tendencies were positively related to degree of hurt, whereas dismissive-avoidant and preoccupied tendencies were negatively, but weakly, related to degree of hurt experienced. Results are discussed in terms of implications for attachment theory.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

hurt (175), attach (165), partner (112), hms (110), relationship (104), degre (58), model (57), secur (51), relat (50), avoid (49), may (49), frequenc (47), messag (46), caregiv (38), report (37), preoccupi (31), like (31), dismiss (29), romant (28), infant (27), style (27),

Author's Keywords:

partner attachment, hurtful messages
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Dailey, Rene. and Le Poire, Beth. "Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111940_index.html>

APA Citation:

Dailey, R. M. and Le Poire, B. A. , 2003-05-27 "Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111940_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study explored the relationship between partner attachment styles and hurtful messages. Attachment styles in addition to frequency of hurtful messages and degree of hurt were examined in 37 romantically involved couples. Based on the tenets of attachment theory, it was argued that hurtful messages are a form of insensitivity or unresponsivity (i.e., the broad category of interactions that influence the attachment relationships formed). Consequently, frequency of hurtful messages as well as degree of hurt experienced were hypothesized to be related to attachment styles. As predicted, results showed that secure tendencies were negatively related to the frequency of hurtful messages reported in the general relationship, whereas preoccupied and dismissive-avoidant tendencies were positively related with the frequency of hurtful messages. Regarding the degree of hurt reported during a specific conflict episode, secure tendencies were positively related to degree of hurt, whereas dismissive-avoidant and preoccupied tendencies were negatively, but weakly, related to degree of hurt experienced. Results are discussed in terms of implications for attachment theory.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 29
Word count: 7496
Text sample:
Hurt and Attachment 1 Running head: HURTFUL MESSAGES AND ATTACHMENT EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HURTFUL MESSAGES AND PARTNER ATTACHMENT Paper submitted to the Interpersonal Division of the International Communication Association for the 2003 conference in San Diego CA. Hurt and Attachment 2 Abstract The present study explored the relationship between partner attachment styles and hurtful messages. Attachment styles in addition to frequency of hurtful messages and degree of hurt were examined in 37 romantically involved couples. Based on the
didn’t hurt my feelings.* What my partner did or said made me feel good. I was hurt by what my partner did or said.* My partner didn’t emotionally wound me by what he/she did or said.* What my partner did or said boosted my self-esteem. What my partner did or said caused me a great deal of emotional pain.* What my partner did or said was not hurtful.* Frequency of Hurtful Messages My feelings are often hurt by things


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