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Reclassifying “Soft” and “Hard” News – Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender?

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Abstract:

Abstract

As early as the 1920s, RCA president David Surnoff claimed that of all radio’s tasks, which include the provision of information and national education, entertainment ranks supreme. Several decades later, however, the obliteration of boundaries between entertainment and information was evident. This is also true of radio, which reflects the processes evolving in other media, which, affected as they are by market forces, adopted a profit and competition orientation characteristic of Western mass media as a whole where news and entertainment have become merged. Concurrent with changes in the status of the news – as a ritual, entertainment or the means to satisfy social needs – the Western media experienced a process of feminization. The present study focuses on the contemporary validity of the equation: women = “soft” news; men = “hard” news and the direction of the future development of newsrooms in light of the feminization of the media. In addition, the study examines the question of whether the above dichotomy is affected by gender or is an outcome of the social and cultural factors of change. In this era of obliterated boundaries between news and info-tainment, and between “hard” and “soft” news, a re-categorization of news coverage patterns is warranted.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

news (166), women (84), media (78), soft (64), hard (55), gender (52), studi (42), men (38), chang (36), issu (33), radio (29), topic (26), practic (26), israel (25), product (24), one (24), program (23), profession (23), find (23), content (22), stori (22),

Author's Keywords:

Gender impact; "Soft:-"Hard" News; info-tainment; re-categorization; culture
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Lavie, Aliza. "Reclassifying “Soft” and “Hard” News – Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111943_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lavie, A. , 2003-05-27 "Reclassifying “Soft” and “Hard” News – Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111943_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Abstract

As early as the 1920s, RCA president David Surnoff claimed that of all radio’s tasks, which include the provision of information and national education, entertainment ranks supreme. Several decades later, however, the obliteration of boundaries between entertainment and information was evident. This is also true of radio, which reflects the processes evolving in other media, which, affected as they are by market forces, adopted a profit and competition orientation characteristic of Western mass media as a whole where news and entertainment have become merged. Concurrent with changes in the status of the news – as a ritual, entertainment or the means to satisfy social needs – the Western media experienced a process of feminization. The present study focuses on the contemporary validity of the equation: women = “soft” news; men = “hard” news and the direction of the future development of newsrooms in light of the feminization of the media. In addition, the study examines the question of whether the above dichotomy is affected by gender or is an outcome of the social and cultural factors of change. In this era of obliterated boundaries between news and info-tainment, and between “hard” and “soft” news, a re-categorization of news coverage patterns is warranted.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 23
Word count: 8027
Text sample:
Reclassifying “Soft” and “Hard” News – Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender? Reclassifying “Soft” and “Hard” News – Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender? Abstract As early as the 1920s RCA president David Surnoff claimed that of all radio’s tasks which include the provision of information and national education entertainment ranks supreme. Several decades later however the obliteration of boundaries between entertainment and information was evident. This is also true of radio which reflects the
News-Room. New York: Columbia University Press. Van Zoonen L. (1988) “Rethinking Women and the News”. European Journal of Communication 3(1): 35-53. --- (1994) Feminist Media Studies. London: Sage. --- (1998) “One of the Girls? The Changing Gender of Journalism”. In: C. Carter G. Branston and S. Allan (eds.) News Gender and Power pp. 33-46. NY: Routledge. Weaver D.H. (1997). “Women as Journalists”. In: Norris P. (ed.) Women Media and Politics (pp. 21-55). New York: Oxford University Press. Weaver D.


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