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Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment
Unformatted Document Text:  Hurt and Attachment 12 degrees, and 3% were pursuing graduate degrees; four individuals declined to indicate their highest level of education. Length of the couples’ romantic relationships ranged from two and a half months to five years (M=1.2, SD=1.1). Partners’ ratings of their commitment to the relationship were also relatively high, averaging 5.7 (SD=1.2) on a 1 - 7 scale in which higher scores indicated greater commitment. Procedures Students of lower division communication courses received class credit for their participation. Couples recruited outside of communication classes received gift certificates as compensation. All couples were informed of the study’s procedures and asked to sign a consent form before participating. After re-enacting a typical conflict while being video-taped as a part of the larger study, the partners were separated and asked to complete a set of questionnaires including both their partner and parent attachment styles. In addition, each participant was asked if their partner hurt them during the conflict they re-enacted. Specifically, they were asked, “At any point during the interaction you just had with your partner, were you hurt by anything your partner did or said; meaning did anything your partner do or say emotionally wound you, whether minimally or a great deal?” If the participant answered no, they were asked to complete another short questionnaire regarding the degree of hurt experienced during the 10-minute re- enactment as well as the general frequency of HMs in their relationship. A yes answer was followed up by asking the participant to point this incident out on the videotape. Various notes were taken regarding this incident that are unrelated to the purpose of this study and are therefore not reported here. Subsequently, the participant was asked to complete the same hurtful messages questionnaire as those who answered no. They also commented on the general

Authors: Dailey, Rene. and Le Poire, Beth.
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Hurt and Attachment 12
degrees, and 3% were pursuing graduate degrees; four individuals declined to indicate their
highest level of education. Length of the couples’ romantic relationships ranged from two and a
half months to five years (M=1.2, SD=1.1). Partners’ ratings of their commitment to the
relationship were also relatively high, averaging 5.7 (SD=1.2) on a 1 - 7 scale in which higher
scores indicated greater commitment.
Procedures
Students of lower division communication courses received class credit for their
participation. Couples recruited outside of communication classes received gift certificates as
compensation. All couples were informed of the study’s procedures and asked to sign a consent
form before participating. After re-enacting a typical conflict while being video-taped as a part of
the larger study, the partners were separated and asked to complete a set of questionnaires
including both their partner and parent attachment styles. In addition, each participant was asked
if their partner hurt them during the conflict they re-enacted. Specifically, they were asked, “At
any point during the interaction you just had with your partner, were you hurt by anything your
partner did or said; meaning did anything your partner do or say emotionally wound you,
whether minimally or a great deal?” If the participant answered no, they were asked to complete
another short questionnaire regarding the degree of hurt experienced during the 10-minute re-
enactment as well as the general frequency of HMs in their relationship. A yes answer was
followed up by asking the participant to point this incident out on the videotape. Various notes
were taken regarding this incident that are unrelated to the purpose of this study and are therefore
not reported here. Subsequently, the participant was asked to complete the same hurtful
messages questionnaire as those who answered no. They also commented on the general


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