All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment
Unformatted Document Text:  Hurt and Attachment 6 worthy of love and attention. Infants who develop anxious-avoidant attachments likely have low self-worth and high trust in others. Because they have had to be attentive to their parents’ actions to determine when they will be available and responsive, these infants have learned that their value lies within other individuals; they depend on others’ impressions of them to determine their worth as a person. Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991) also suggest a fourth category, labeled “fearfuls,” who have low self worth and low trust in others. Though this category is rare, these individuals are characterized as avoiding relationships because they do not trust others and do not believe they are worthy of love. If HMs are conceptualized as inappropriate responsivity, they may have a similar influence on children’s working models. Although not measured in the current investigation, infrequent HMs and a high level of responsive behaviors by the caregiver instill in the child a high level of trust in the caregiver as well as a high level of self-worth. If they are seldom wounded emotionally and consistently validated, children learn that their caregivers are reliable and that they are deserving of care. In contrast, frequent HMs may facilitate distrust in the caregiver. This creates a distancing in the relationship, which necessitates self-reliance on the part of the child, thereby facilitating high self-worth. A mix of caring behaviors and HMs may confuse the child regarding when they will be hurt, thereby forcing the child to be more attuned to their caregivers’ actions in order to predict when HMs will occur. This likely facilitates a dependence on the caregivers to determine their self-worth. Thus, similar to the concept of responsivity, HMs may shape the working models or schemas children develop regarding others in relationships.

Authors: Dailey, Rene. and Le Poire, Beth.
first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last



background image
Hurt and Attachment 6
worthy of love and attention. Infants who develop anxious-avoidant attachments likely have low
self-worth and high trust in others. Because they have had to be attentive to their parents’ actions
to determine when they will be available and responsive, these infants have learned that their
value lies within other individuals; they depend on others’ impressions of them to determine their
worth as a person. Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991) also suggest a fourth category, labeled
“fearfuls,” who have low self worth and low trust in others. Though this category is rare, these
individuals are characterized as avoiding relationships because they do not trust others and do
not believe they are worthy of love.
If HMs are conceptualized as inappropriate responsivity, they may have a similar
influence on children’s working models. Although not measured in the current investigation,
infrequent HMs and a high level of responsive behaviors by the caregiver instill in the child a
high level of trust in the caregiver as well as a high level of self-worth. If they are seldom
wounded emotionally and consistently validated, children learn that their caregivers are reliable
and that they are deserving of care. In contrast, frequent HMs may facilitate distrust in the
caregiver. This creates a distancing in the relationship, which necessitates self-reliance on the
part of the child, thereby facilitating high self-worth. A mix of caring behaviors and HMs may
confuse the child regarding when they will be hurt, thereby forcing the child to be more attuned
to their caregivers’ actions in order to predict when HMs will occur. This likely facilitates a
dependence on the caregivers to determine their self-worth. Thus, similar to the concept of
responsivity, HMs may shape the working models or schemas children develop regarding others
in relationships.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.