All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Relationship Between Hurtful Messages and Partner Attachment
Unformatted Document Text:  Hurt and Attachment 7 Partner Attachment Although there is no biological basis for an attachment to romantic partners as there is with the infant-caregiver relationship, adults form a similar attachment bond with their romantic partners (Collins & Read, 1990). The working models individuals develop as children, shaped by past experience with their caregivers, influence this adult relationship style. The partners in some ways become the secure base (Cohn, Silver, Cowan, Cowan, & Pearson, 1992). Le Poire et al. (1997) discuss how fears stemming from child-caregiver attachment, specifically intimacy and abandonment, affect adult relationships. Individuals with secure attachments, because they have high self-worth and high trust in others (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991), have low intimacy and abandonment fears. They believe they can rely on their partners in times of need and believe they deserved to be loved. Those with avoidant attachments, due to moderate abandonment fears and high intimacy fears (caused frequently by the demands of their caregivers to provide parenting to them), keep their partners at a distance to prevent the potential of being hurt or abandoned as they were by their caregivers. Those with anxious-ambivalent attachments, likely having moderate intimacy fears and high abandonment fears, become over-involved with their partners’ and are hesitant regarding intimacy because they are afraid of partners’ learning of their true, unworthy selves. These fears, an important component in their working models, translate into their adult attachment styles: secure, dismissive-avoidant, or preoccupied (Le Poire et al., 1997). Individuals’ working models may also influence their partner choice. As Collins and Read (1990) note, individuals may enter relationships with others that match their working models (i.e., their expectations and beliefs) because this is the type of relationship to which their “attachment system” is prepared to respond. However, attachments are not stable or static.

Authors: Dailey, Rene. and Le Poire, Beth.
first   previous   Page 7 of 29   next   last



background image
Hurt and Attachment 7
Partner Attachment
Although there is no biological basis for an attachment to romantic partners as there is
with the infant-caregiver relationship, adults form a similar attachment bond with their romantic
partners (Collins & Read, 1990). The working models individuals develop as children, shaped by
past experience with their caregivers, influence this adult relationship style. The partners in some
ways become the secure base (Cohn, Silver, Cowan, Cowan, & Pearson, 1992). Le Poire et al.
(1997) discuss how fears stemming from child-caregiver attachment, specifically intimacy and
abandonment, affect adult relationships. Individuals with secure attachments, because they have
high self-worth and high trust in others (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991), have low intimacy
and abandonment fears. They believe they can rely on their partners in times of need and believe
they deserved to be loved. Those with avoidant attachments, due to moderate abandonment fears
and high intimacy fears (caused frequently by the demands of their caregivers to provide
parenting to them), keep their partners at a distance to prevent the potential of being hurt or
abandoned as they were by their caregivers. Those with anxious-ambivalent attachments, likely
having moderate intimacy fears and high abandonment fears, become over-involved with their
partners’ and are hesitant regarding intimacy because they are afraid of partners’ learning of their
true, unworthy selves. These fears, an important component in their working models, translate
into their adult attachment styles: secure, dismissive-avoidant, or preoccupied (Le Poire et al.,
1997).
Individuals’ working models may also influence their partner choice. As Collins and
Read (1990) note, individuals may enter relationships with others that match their working
models (i.e., their expectations and beliefs) because this is the type of relationship to which their
“attachment system” is prepared to respond. However, attachments are not stable or static.


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.