All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Reclassifying Soft and Hard News Culture Specific Findings or a Reflection of Gender?
Unformatted Document Text:  gender and media is especially prominent in the field of radio, where research interest has been so scant as to warrant the label the “’Cinderella’ of academic research and study” (Wilby & Conroy, 1994:15). The first, grounded in the premise of a basic otherness between men and women, claims (see e.g., Beasley, 1993; Covert, 1981; ˜Muramatsu, 1990 Pandian, 1999; Rakow, 1992) that changes in traditional media patterns, including media content, discourse, and in the nature and style of news will result when women become a majority and “dominate” the media, especially newsrooms, and are thus able to unleash their “true” nature. No uniformity of opinion exists, however, among researchers on the question of the potential for change and the type of change to be expected. Two studies identified a gender effect in the twenty-first century. Findings of the first, which focused on broadcast journalism, compared radio and television newsrooms in Sweden (where a gender balance has existed for over ten years) and Finland (where greater numbers of women have only recently joined the media), pointed to a gender effect: Swedish newscasts contained more “soft” stories while programs anchored by women were more investigative and contained more disclosures. In contrast, In Finland, fewer differences were found between programs anchored by men and women (Zilliacus-Tikkanen 1996, cited in Haworth, 2000). A second study was conducted in Israel and identified a gender effect on media contents, specifically, on the contents of news magazines and current affairs programs in two public radio stations in Israel: “Army Radio” and “The Voice of Israel”. No gender effect, however, was found in the representation of women interviewed in broadcasts, which remained low at 10%)(Lavie, 2001). Among a second school of thought which identifies no gender effect on media practice are two general groups of researchers. The first group claims that media practice is professional and non-gendered in nature, or, in clear-cut terms: news and news; they have no sex. Furthermore, if such feminine values and attributes do not exist, the anticipated and desirable change is the very decomposition of the stereotypes of “masculine” and “feminine” values, one of the practical expressions of which would be the penetration of women into traditionally “masculine” areas of coverage. According to this view, although the current differential status attributed to “hard” and “soft” news will remain, the equations of ‘“hard” news =men and “soft”

Authors: Lavie, Aliza.
first   previous   Page 7 of 23   next   last



background image
gender and media is especially prominent in the field of radio, where research interest
has been so scant as to warrant the label the “’Cinderella’ of academic research and
study” (Wilby & Conroy, 1994:15).
The first, grounded in the premise of a basic otherness between men and women,
claims (see e.g., Beasley, 1993; Covert, 1981;
˜Muramatsu, 1990 Pandian, 1999;
Rakow, 1992) that changes in traditional media patterns, including media content,
discourse, and in the nature and style of news will result when women become a
majority and “dominate” the media, especially newsrooms, and are thus able to
unleash their “true” nature. No uniformity of opinion exists, however, among
researchers on the question of the potential for change and the type of change to be
expected.
Two studies identified a gender effect in the twenty-first century. Findings of the first,
which focused on broadcast journalism, compared radio and television newsrooms in
Sweden (where a gender balance has existed for over ten years) and Finland (where
greater numbers of women have only recently joined the media), pointed to a gender
effect: Swedish newscasts contained more “soft” stories while programs anchored by
women were more investigative and contained more disclosures. In contrast, In
Finland, fewer differences were found between programs anchored by men and
women (Zilliacus-Tikkanen 1996, cited in Haworth, 2000). A second study was
conducted in Israel and identified a gender effect on media contents, specifically, on
the contents of news magazines and current affairs programs in two public radio
stations in Israel: “Army Radio” and “The Voice of Israel”. No gender effect,
however, was found in the representation of women interviewed in broadcasts, which
remained low at 10%)(Lavie, 2001).
Among a second school of thought which identifies no gender effect on media
practice are two general groups of researchers. The first group claims that media
practice is professional and non-gendered in nature, or, in clear-cut terms: news and
news; they have no sex. Furthermore, if such feminine values and attributes do not
exist, the anticipated and desirable change is the very decomposition of the
stereotypes of “masculine” and “feminine” values, one of the practical expressions of
which would be the penetration of women into traditionally “masculine” areas of
coverage. According to this view, although the current differential status attributed to
“hard” and “soft” news will remain, the equations of ‘“hard” news =men and “soft”


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 7 of 23   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.