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Effectiveness of E-mail Marketing in Korea: What Types of E-mail Ads Are Being Read?
Unformatted Document Text:  Effectiveness of E-mail Marketing 3 Unsolicited e-mail represents a substantial problem for both consumers and marketers (DoubleClick, 2002). Consumers have expressed an increased interested in maintaining the privacy of their e-mail addresses. Marketers are concerned that increases in the amount of e-mail are creating too much clutter through which to get their messages. In contrast, permission-based e-mail has become a critical communication channel between marketers and consumers. According to a survey conducted by DoubleClick (2001), 65% of participants responded that permission-based e-mails were their preferred method of learning or being notified about new products, services, and promotions. This high level of preference for e-mail based marketing communication is not surprising when one considers that the content delivered in permission- based e-mails is information that matches the consumer’s stated interest. The interest/information congruency of permission-based e-mails probably also generates higher message attention and comprehension levels as compared to unsolicited e-mails. However, one should refrain from taking a wholly optimistic perspective on the outcomes of permission-based e-mails. A number of issues related to e-mail marketing in general appear to moderate consumer attitude and behavior toward this form of communication. There has been a dramatic increase in the amount of commercial e-mail that individuals are receiving daily. Many e-mails are deleted without receiving any attention. The daily clutter of commercial e-mail is creating information overload for consumers, who in reaction are decreasingly differentiating between “solicited” and “unsolicited” e-mails. ReturnPath (2001, in Pawley, 2001) found that78% of consumers noted receiving unsolicited e-mails when in fact they were receiving permission-based e-mails. Thus it should not be assume that permission-based e-mails would exclusively produce positive effects. In fact, one might speculate that permission-based e-mails that deliver advertising messages without useful information or value to the consumer might be considered unsolicited spam e- mail. In this case, one should expect permission-based e-mail to exert a negative influence. The current study examines the relationship between the types of e-mails (i.e., permissioned vs. unsolicited) and the response outcomes of consumers (i.e., attitude toward the ad and

Authors: Won, Woo-Hyun., Lee, Jiyoung. and Lee, Joo-Hyun.
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Effectiveness of E-mail Marketing 3
Unsolicited e-mail represents a substantial problem for both consumers and marketers
(DoubleClick, 2002). Consumers have expressed an increased interested in maintaining the privacy of
their e-mail addresses. Marketers are concerned that increases in the amount of e-mail are creating too
much clutter through which to get their messages.
In contrast, permission-based e-mail has become a critical communication channel
between marketers and consumers. According to a survey conducted by DoubleClick (2001), 65% of
participants responded that permission-based e-mails were their preferred method of learning or being
notified about new products, services, and promotions. This high level of preference for e-mail based
marketing communication is not surprising when one considers that the content delivered in permission-
based e-mails is information that matches the consumer’s stated interest. The interest/information
congruency of permission-based e-mails probably also generates higher message attention and
comprehension levels as compared to unsolicited e-mails.
However, one should refrain from taking a wholly optimistic perspective on the outcomes
of permission-based e-mails. A number of issues related to e-mail marketing in general appear to
moderate consumer attitude and behavior toward this form of communication. There has been a dramatic
increase in the amount of commercial e-mail that individuals are receiving daily. Many e-mails are
deleted without receiving any attention. The daily clutter of commercial e-mail is creating information
overload for consumers, who in reaction are decreasingly differentiating between “solicited” and
“unsolicited” e-mails. ReturnPath (2001, in Pawley, 2001) found that78% of consumers noted receiving
unsolicited e-mails when in fact they were receiving permission-based e-mails.
Thus it should not be assume that permission-based e-mails would exclusively produce
positive effects. In fact, one might speculate that permission-based e-mails that deliver advertising
messages without useful information or value to the consumer might be considered unsolicited spam e-
mail. In this case, one should expect permission-based e-mail to exert a negative influence.
The current study examines the relationship between the types of e-mails (i.e.,
permissioned vs. unsolicited) and the response outcomes of consumers (i.e., attitude toward the ad and


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