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Gaming at a LAN-event: the social context of playing digital interactive games (DIGs)
Unformatted Document Text:  Gaming at a LAN event 8 Participants: The field research for this project was carried out in July 2002 during Campzone2, one of the largest LAN events in the Netherlands. About 1200 people gathered on a huge campsite to play their favorite games on a Local Area Network. Almost all visitors of Campzone2 were male, about 30 were female. Consequently, our sample of 176 participants was almost exclusively male (170), with a tiny minority of six women. Procedure: Individual participants were approached with the request to contribute to our research by filling out the questionnaire. In some cases, the questionnaire was administered in a small group of people that happened to sit together. No one refused to contribute, and many gamers expressed a particular interest in our study. It took the participants about twenty minutes to answer the questions. At the end of the list they could fill in a form if they wanted to receive a summary of the results of this project. Measures: The questionnaire consisted of two parts. First, a set of 17 forced choice questions about demographics (age, gender, relationships), the availability of computers and/or game-consoles, the frequency of gaming, what their favorite game was, whether they were members of a ‘clan’ that played a particular game, and how often they visited LAN events. The second part was a set of 28 scaled statements meant to tap motives. The participants were asked to express whether they agreed or disagreed with the statements on a Likert type five-point scale (1 = disagree totally; 5 = agree totally). By the construction of items about competition, control, entertainment, escapism, and pastime we relied partly on Barnett’s Videogame Questionnaire (Barnett et al., 1997), and also on research about motives for watching television (Conway and Rubin, 1991). Relevant items had to be translated and rephrased in order to fit the context of a LAN event. All items about social motives were newly designed for this project. The final list of items was tested for comprehensibility at two small scale LAN events, with 25 and 40 participants, respectively. Some items were rewritten, others were dropped. The revised final list of 28 items was administered at Campzone2. The 28 statements about motives were subjected to an exploratory PCA (varimax rotation). This resulted in 8 components with an eigenvalue > 1. These were, however, impossible to interpret substantially. Therefore, we applied the scree criterion and conducted a second PCA with a restriction of 4 factors, which explained 46.5 % of the variance. Three items failed to load > .40 on any factor and were removed from the analysis (“go to LAN to escape from my family”, “a weekend without gaming would be boring”, “if I win on a LAN, it makes me feel good about myself”). The four factors were interpreted within a uses and gratification vocabulary as four motives (see Table 1): (1) competition, participants who scored on this motive went to a LAN event in order to win (10 items, eigenvalue = 7.35),

Authors: Jansz, Jeroen. and Martens, Lonneke.
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Gaming at a LAN event 8
Participants: The field research for this project was carried out in July 2002 during
Campzone2, one of the largest LAN events in the Netherlands. About 1200 people gathered
on a huge campsite to play their favorite games on a Local Area Network. Almost all visitors
of Campzone2 were male, about 30 were female. Consequently, our sample of 176
participants was almost exclusively male (170), with a tiny minority of six women.
Procedure: Individual participants were approached with the request to contribute to
our research by filling out the questionnaire. In some cases, the questionnaire was
administered in a small group of people that happened to sit together. No one refused to
contribute, and many gamers expressed a particular interest in our study. It took the
participants about twenty minutes to answer the questions. At the end of the list they could fill
in a form if they wanted to receive a summary of the results of this project.
Measures: The questionnaire consisted of two parts. First, a set of 17 forced choice
questions about demographics (age, gender, relationships), the availability of computers
and/or game-consoles, the frequency of gaming, what their favorite game was, whether they
were members of a ‘clan’ that played a particular game, and how often they visited LAN
events.
The second part was a set of 28 scaled statements meant to tap motives. The
participants were asked to express whether they agreed or disagreed with the statements on a
Likert type five-point scale (1 = disagree totally; 5 = agree totally). By the construction of
items about competition, control, entertainment, escapism, and pastime we relied partly on
Barnett’s Videogame Questionnaire (Barnett et al., 1997), and also on research about motives
for watching television (Conway and Rubin, 1991). Relevant items had to be translated and
rephrased in order to fit the context of a LAN event. All items about social motives were
newly designed for this project. The final list of items was tested for comprehensibility at two
small scale LAN events, with 25 and 40 participants, respectively. Some items were rewritten,
others were dropped. The revised final list of 28 items was administered at Campzone2.
The 28 statements about motives were subjected to an exploratory PCA (varimax
rotation). This resulted in 8 components with an eigenvalue > 1. These were, however,
impossible to interpret substantially. Therefore, we applied the scree criterion and conducted
a second PCA with a restriction of 4 factors, which explained 46.5 % of the variance. Three
items failed to load > .40 on any factor and were removed from the analysis (“go to LAN to
escape from my family”, “a weekend without gaming would be boring”, “if I win on a LAN,
it makes me feel good about myself”). The four factors were interpreted within a uses and
gratification vocabulary as four motives (see Table 1):
(1) competition, participants who scored on this motive went to a LAN event in order to
win (10 items, eigenvalue = 7.35),


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