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Have women journalists in Israel really integrated into the profession?
Unformatted Document Text:  13 attitude indicating that this is not the case. This finding is similar to other studies around the world on women journalists from the 1970s where it was systematically found that a gap existed between the relative status of women and their male colleagues, as well as between each group’s perception of the situation. Hence Ceulemans and Fauconnier claimed that there is a paradox: despite their lower status compared to men, women in the media in North America and Europe are relatively pleased with their work conditions 40 . Apparently, over the years there has been some improvement. Australian 41 and British 42 surveys from the 1990s show that a higher percentage of women complained about discrimination (by women and men) compared to previous years. Similarly a survey among American women journalists in the daily press in the first half of the 1990s shows that many women feel discriminated against with respect to salary, assignments and promotion. About half of them thought there was some sort of discrimination against women and about a quarter had experienced discrimination personally 43 . Perhaps this development can be attributed to the increasing awareness of equal rights for women. This kind of gap between the actual discrimination and perceptions of lack of discrimination has a precedent in other studies of Israeli women 44 . It may be explained by different factors: first, the general tendency of women to evaluate their contribution as being less valuable than that of men, and their tendency to assume they deserve lower rewards 45 . Evidence for this can be found here in the journalists’ own words. For example: Tamar 46 , a senior editor, claims that she knows without a doubt that the men who had previously performed her job had earned much more money than she: I feel it’s not right. I think we [women] give up on our legitimate right to earn equally, because we feel thankful that our talent was recognized. It’s awful. Second, the absence of feelings of discrimination on the part of women journalists,

Authors: Lachover, Einat.
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attitude indicating that this is not the case. This finding is similar to other studies
around the world on women journalists from the 1970s where it was systematically
found that a gap existed between the relative status of women and their male
colleagues, as well as between each group’s perception of the situation. Hence
Ceulemans and Fauconnier claimed that there is a paradox: despite their lower status
compared to men, women in the media in North America and Europe are relatively
pleased with their work conditions
40
. Apparently, over the years there has been some
improvement. Australian
41
and British
42
surveys from the 1990s show that a higher
percentage of women complained about discrimination (by women and men)
compared to previous years. Similarly a survey among American women journalists
in the daily press in the first half of the 1990s shows that many women feel
discriminated against with respect to salary, assignments and promotion. About half
of them thought there was some sort of discrimination against women and about a
quarter had experienced discrimination personally
43
. Perhaps this development can be
attributed to the increasing awareness of equal rights for women.
This kind of gap between the actual discrimination and perceptions of lack of
discrimination has a precedent in other studies of Israeli women
44
. It may be
explained by different factors: first, the general tendency of women to evaluate their
contribution as being less valuable than that of men, and their tendency to assume
they deserve lower rewards
45
. Evidence for this can be found here in the journalists’
own words. For example: Tamar
46
, a senior editor, claims that she knows without a
doubt that the men who had previously performed her job had earned much more
money than she:
I feel it’s not right. I think we [women] give up on our legitimate right to earn equally,
because we feel thankful that our talent was recognized. It’s awful.
Second, the absence of feelings of discrimination on the part of women journalists,


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