Citation

Teaching Up: Teaching About Privilege Without Being Privileged

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Teaching is an increasingly difficult profession given the current political and economic climate. One of the most challenging aspects of teaching sociology, especially at the introductory level, is helping students understand the concepts of white privilege, male privilege, and how intersectionality works in our society.
This Informal Roundtable Discussion addresses the specific issues of “teaching up” (teaching about privilege when you occupy a historically marginalized position in society).
What does it mean to be a woman, a non-gender conforming person, a gay or lesbian or queer identifying person, a non-Christian, or a person of color teaching Sociology? Furthermore, how do we as people from historically marginalized perspectives teach our often privileged and sometimes close-minded students to recognize their privilege and how oppression works in the world in a non-judgmental, non-confrontational way? What kinds of techniques, approaches or activities make “teaching up” more feasible and help us reach students where they are in their educational journey? How do we leverage students’ own experiences and perspectives to help inform their classmates? These are some of the topics I would like to explore with other sociologists to share best practices and learn new techniques.
Most Common Document Word Stems:

0 (1),
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119837_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Atkins, Celeste. "Teaching Up: Teaching About Privilege Without Being Privileged" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 <Not Available>. 2017-11-01 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119837_index.html>

APA Citation:

Atkins, C. , 2016-08-17 "Teaching Up: Teaching About Privilege Without Being Privileged" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA Online <PDF>. 2017-11-01 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1119837_index.html

Publication Type: Informal Discussion Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Teaching is an increasingly difficult profession given the current political and economic climate. One of the most challenging aspects of teaching sociology, especially at the introductory level, is helping students understand the concepts of white privilege, male privilege, and how intersectionality works in our society.
This Informal Roundtable Discussion addresses the specific issues of “teaching up” (teaching about privilege when you occupy a historically marginalized position in society).
What does it mean to be a woman, a non-gender conforming person, a gay or lesbian or queer identifying person, a non-Christian, or a person of color teaching Sociology? Furthermore, how do we as people from historically marginalized perspectives teach our often privileged and sometimes close-minded students to recognize their privilege and how oppression works in the world in a non-judgmental, non-confrontational way? What kinds of techniques, approaches or activities make “teaching up” more feasible and help us reach students where they are in their educational journey? How do we leverage students’ own experiences and perspectives to help inform their classmates? These are some of the topics I would like to explore with other sociologists to share best practices and learn new techniques.


Similar Titles:
GIFTS: Using Your Privilege to Teach About Privilege


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.