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Home is Where You Serve: Globalization and Nationalism in Korean Popular Music
Unformatted Document Text:  6 commodified form and its mobility, popular music in the era of globalization is often becomes an easy target for homogenization of culture throughout the world. However, popular music on a global scale also has possibilities of networking alliances across political, geographical, cultural, and economic boundaries. Interestingly, the global space often provides opportunities for one local to meet another. Globalized cultural technologies and networks of production and distribution have generated more and more locally produced and consumed works in a very global context. As Dayan (1998) points out, the scope of the research of fragile communities such as diaspora and immigrants should not be limited to a specific geographic location. Rather we need to look at a communication device that links peripheries to centers. Around such a communication device, globalization happens in multifaceted processes of territorialization, de- territorialization, and re-territorialization that different versions of the identity of the same group are contesting. Drawing a boundary around a particular space is a relational act that depends upon the figuration of significant other localities. Studying local music therefore is rather based on “process geographies” (Appadurai, 2000) that sees significant human activities and interactions—migrants, media, travel, exile, colonization, and so forth. Indeed, recognizing and imagining regions and the world itself is a globalized phenomenon, and musical space is not tightly bound; rather, the geographies of music are varied, uneven, and changing. Music is often perceived as the most internationalized form of culture because people in many different countries, speaking different languages, often relate to the same kinds of music. Because the drivers behind globalization are economies of scale (providing standardized products to as many customers as possible), the transferability of

Authors: Lee, Hee-Eun.
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commodified form and its mobility, popular music in the era of globalization is often
becomes an easy target for homogenization of culture throughout the world. However,
popular music on a global scale also has possibilities of networking alliances across
political, geographical, cultural, and economic boundaries. Interestingly, the global space
often provides opportunities for one local to meet another. Globalized cultural
technologies and networks of production and distribution have generated more and more
locally produced and consumed works in a very global context. As Dayan (1998) points
out, the scope of the research of fragile communities such as diaspora and immigrants
should not be limited to a specific geographic location. Rather we need to look at a
communication device that links peripheries to centers. Around such a communication
device, globalization happens in multifaceted processes of territorialization, de-
territorialization, and re-territorialization that different versions of the identity of the
same group are contesting. Drawing a boundary around a particular space is a relational
act that depends upon the figuration of significant other localities. Studying local music
therefore is rather based on “process geographies” (Appadurai, 2000) that sees significant
human activities and interactions—migrants, media, travel, exile, colonization, and so
forth. Indeed, recognizing and imagining regions and the world itself is a globalized
phenomenon, and musical space is not tightly bound; rather, the geographies of music are
varied, uneven, and changing.
Music is often perceived as the most internationalized form of culture because
people in many different countries, speaking different languages, often relate to the same
kinds of music. Because the drivers behind globalization are economies of scale
(providing standardized products to as many customers as possible), the transferability of


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