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Ad Repetition and Variation in a Competitive Ad Context
Unformatted Document Text:  12 repetition as the substantive/cosmetic variation strategy, involving both substantive variation and cosmetic variation, as illustrated in Table 1. Specifically, this study will explore the relative effectiveness of the substantive/cosmetic variation strategy in comparison to the cosmetic variation strategy. --------------------------------- Table 1 about here --------------------------------- Variation Strategies on Ad Memory Multiple exposures to the same ad have been shown to be less effective than exposure to ads with varying executions (Unnava & Burnkrant, 1987; 1991). Unnava and Burnkrant (1991) have proposed two explanations to further our understanding of the possible underlying mechanism. First, they have reasoned that the encoding variability hypothesis can argue for the superiority of recall under varied ad contexts than under unvaried ad contexts. The encoding variability hypothesis suggests that presenting messages in varied contexts generates multiple retrieval routes to the remembered information. In contrast, repeating information without changing execution leaves only one contextual cue for later retrieval. Secondly, they have proposed that the superiority of recall under varied ad contexts, in comparison to unvaried ad contexts, can be understood through the differential attention explanation, which suggests that, when exposed to identical information repeatedly, the level of attention allocated to later exposure decreases, whereas, when ad executions are varied, the second occurrence of the message will still draw a similar amount of attention. Unnava and Burnkrant (1991) have found support for the encoding variability hypothesis. In the presence of competitive interference, Unnava and Sirdeshmukh (1994) have specifically shown that two contextual paths in memory help reduce the negative interference effects of

Authors: Chang, Chingching.
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repetition as the substantive/cosmetic variation strategy, involving both substantive variation and
cosmetic variation, as illustrated in Table 1. Specifically, this study will explore the relative
effectiveness of the substantive/cosmetic variation strategy in comparison to the cosmetic
variation strategy.
---------------------------------
Table 1 about here
---------------------------------
Variation Strategies on Ad Memory
Multiple exposures to the same ad have been shown to be less effective than exposure to ads
with varying executions (Unnava & Burnkrant, 1987; 1991). Unnava and Burnkrant (1991)
have proposed two explanations to further our understanding of the possible underlying
mechanism. First, they have reasoned that the encoding variability hypothesis can argue for the
superiority of recall under varied ad contexts than under unvaried ad contexts. The encoding
variability hypothesis suggests that presenting messages in varied contexts generates multiple
retrieval routes to the remembered information. In contrast, repeating information without
changing execution leaves only one contextual cue for later retrieval.
Secondly, they have proposed that the superiority of recall under varied ad contexts, in
comparison to unvaried ad contexts, can be understood through the differential attention
explanation, which suggests that, when exposed to identical information repeatedly, the level of
attention allocated to later exposure decreases, whereas, when ad executions are varied, the
second occurrence of the message will still draw a similar amount of attention.
Unnava and Burnkrant (1991) have found support for the encoding variability hypothesis.
In the presence of competitive interference, Unnava and Sirdeshmukh (1994) have specifically
shown that two contextual paths in memory help reduce the negative interference effects of


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