All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Ad Repetition and Variation in a Competitive Ad Context
Unformatted Document Text:  16 advertising, marketing or psychology were allowed to participate. Fifty percent of the subjects were male. Stimuli Stimuli ads were created by professionals working at Ogilvy & Mather Ad Agency (see Appendix A). Professional copywriters and creative people wrote ad messages to fit different conditions. To reduce confounding effects from using visuals that may generate different favorability ratings in different conditions, visuals were pretested before ad copy was inserted. ANOVA results indicated that the three visuals used in the experiment were rated equally in terms of liking (F(1, 19) = 2.03, p = .15), good (F(1, 19) = 1.05, p = .36), interesting (F(1, 19) = .04, p = .96), attention drawing (F(1, 19) = .98, p = .38), attractive (F(1, 19) = .44, p = .65) and suitable for advertising sneakers (F(1, 19) = 1.19, p = .32). To improve external validity, the stimuli ads were inserted between two genuine filler ads. Procedures Subjects were told that the research was designed to understand how different layouts of printed ads impact viewers’ information processing. Subjects then read brief instructions about the procedures and the purpose of the study. Then, depending on which condition they were assigned to, they were either asked to read a packet of four ads (one stimuli ad for Nike, one stimuli ad for Sperry and two filler ads) or a packet of five ads (one ad for Nike, two ads for Sperry and two filler ads) that were bound together as they would appear in magazines. For these two conditions, one filler ad was inserted in the first position and the other filler ad was inserted in the last position in the packet. After reading the ads, the moderators collected the stimuli packets and distributed questionnaires for subjects to complete. Subjects were first asked to rate fixed scales to capture their ad and brand responses. At the end of the questionnaire, subjects were asked what they thought was the purpose of the study. None of

Authors: Chang, Chingching.
first   previous   Page 16 of 31   next   last



background image
16
advertising, marketing or psychology were allowed to participate. Fifty percent of the subjects
were male.
Stimuli
Stimuli ads were created by professionals working at Ogilvy & Mather Ad Agency (see
Appendix A). Professional copywriters and creative people wrote ad messages to fit different
conditions. To reduce confounding effects from using visuals that may generate different
favorability ratings in different conditions, visuals were pretested before ad copy was inserted.
ANOVA results indicated that the three visuals used in the experiment were rated equally in
terms of liking (F(1, 19) = 2.03, p = .15), good (F(1, 19) = 1.05, p = .36), interesting (F(1, 19)
= .04, p = .96), attention drawing (F(1, 19) = .98, p = .38), attractive (F(1, 19) = .44, p = .65) and
suitable for advertising sneakers (F(1, 19) = 1.19, p = .32). To improve external validity, the
stimuli ads were inserted between two genuine filler ads.
Procedures
Subjects were told that the research was designed to understand how different layouts of
printed ads impact viewers’ information processing. Subjects then read brief instructions about
the procedures and the purpose of the study. Then, depending on which condition they were
assigned to, they were either asked to read a packet of four ads (one stimuli ad for Nike, one
stimuli ad for Sperry and two filler ads) or a packet of five ads (one ad for Nike, two ads for
Sperry and two filler ads) that were bound together as they would appear in magazines. For
these two conditions, one filler ad was inserted in the first position and the other filler ad was
inserted in the last position in the packet. After reading the ads, the moderators collected the
stimuli packets and distributed questionnaires for subjects to complete. Subjects were first
asked to rate fixed scales to capture their ad and brand responses. At the end of the
questionnaire, subjects were asked what they thought was the purpose of the study. None of


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.