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Fracturing the Real-Self<-->Fake-Self Dichotomy: Moving Toward “Crystallized” Organizational Discourses and Identities
Unformatted Document Text:  Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy 10 turn to an examination of managerialism and entrepreneurialism, two such discourses that posit “preferred” organizational identities. Discourses of power articulate an idealized subject position, and in organizational contexts, that idealized position reflects the interests of the organization more than the interests of the individual—a process referred to by Deetz (1992) as managerialism. Managerialism functions as an ideology or “systematic logic” whose “central motif is control” and its primary code is money (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). When employees “buy into” the money code of managerialism, they begin to pursue organizational “payoffs” almost exclusively and “cash out” alternative rewards, including enjoying leisure time, pursuing meaningful and fulfilling work, or building strong communities. Deetz (1992) claims that the endless pursuit of money and power reverberates throughout managers' private and public lives. Given management's actual ability [or, more precisely, lack thereof] to make decisions of allocation of resources, it is significant that they give themselves money and symbols of power rather than free time, autonomy and flexibility. And it is significant how much of the money they earn is spend on further symbols of money and power that are often seen as essential for a corporate image for the sake of . . . (Deetz, 1992, p. 234). Managerialism is a way of doing and being in corporations that partially structures all groups while simultaneously conflicting with, and at times suppressing, each group’s other modes of thinking” (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). Juliet Schor (1992, 1998) provides startling evidence that managerialism, epitomized by the pervasive “work-and-spend cycle” is not only common, but increasingly dysfunctional. This cycle and its attendant managerialist identity is not “an ahistorical trait of human nature,” but a social construction borne of modern-day, organizationally-re/produced capitalism. Both Schor and Deetz would argue that the preferred or idealized self is not necessarily our own choosing; rather, it is a product, an effect of discourses of power

Authors: Tracy, Sarah. and Trethewey, Angela.
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Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy
10
turn to an examination of managerialism and entrepreneurialism, two such discourses that posit
“preferred” organizational identities.
Discourses of power articulate an idealized subject position, and in organizational
contexts, that idealized position reflects the interests of the organization more than the interests of
the individual—a process referred to by Deetz (1992) as managerialism. Managerialism functions
as an ideology or “systematic logic” whose “central motif is control” and its primary code is
money (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). When employees “buy into” the money code of managerialism,
they begin to pursue organizational “payoffs” almost exclusively and “cash out” alternative
rewards, including enjoying leisure time, pursuing meaningful and fulfilling work, or building
strong communities. Deetz (1992) claims that the endless pursuit of money and power
reverberates throughout managers' private and public lives.
Given management's actual ability [or, more precisely, lack thereof] to make decisions of
allocation of resources, it is significant that they give themselves money and symbols of
power rather than free time, autonomy and flexibility. And it is significant how much of
the money they earn is spend on further symbols of money and power that are often seen
as essential for a corporate image for the sake of . . . (Deetz, 1992, p. 234).
Managerialism is a way of doing and being in corporations that partially structures all groups
while simultaneously conflicting with, and at times suppressing, each group’s other modes of
thinking” (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). Juliet Schor (1992, 1998) provides startling evidence that
managerialism, epitomized by the pervasive “work-and-spend cycle” is not only common, but
increasingly dysfunctional. This cycle and its attendant managerialist identity is not “an
ahistorical trait of human nature,” but a social construction borne of modern-day,
organizationally-re/produced capitalism. Both Schor and Deetz would argue that the preferred or
idealized self is not necessarily our own choosing; rather, it is a product, an effect of discourses of
power


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