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Fracturing the Real-Self<-->Fake-Self Dichotomy: Moving Toward “Crystallized” Organizational Discourses and Identities
Unformatted Document Text:  Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy 11 It should be noted that the discourse of managerialism can be articulated and enacted by any and all organizational members, “owners, workers, and society—and defines a place for each of these groups” (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). Therefore, while managerialism promotes a certain subject position and a particular set of interests, identity is not necessarily imposed upon workers; employees take an active, strategic role in their acceptance of organizationally-preferred selves (Deetz, 1998; Tracy, 2000). Nevertheless, identity is largely created in relation to managerialist discourses that encompass an organizationally-prescribed ideal, a process that produces specific outcomes including an organizationally-defined self that comes to be understood and experienced as “real” and of our own choosing. Entrepreneurialism is another pervasive discourse of power that hails a “preferred” organizational/cultural subject. The “entrepreneurial self” (Miller & Rose, 1990) or the “enterprising subject” (du Gay, 1996) is responsible and actively engaged in creating a new and better self. The entrepreneurial worker is depicted as “an enterprising individual in search of meaning, responsibility, and a sense of personal achievement in life, and hence in work” (Miller & Rose, 1995, p. 454). Entrepreneurialism's subject is the “active, self-motivated individual, accepting responsibility for its own fate, keen to identify clearly its aims and desires, to remove barriers to its fulfillment, to monitor success in realizing them” (Keat & Abercrombie, 1991, p. 11). The discourse of entrepreneurialism is invoked in the self-help and success literature, particularly in texts aimed at working women (Nadesan & Trethewey, 2000). Myriad ads encourage women, to become their “best self” (whether that is the best sex-object or best career woman) through the use of products such as food processors, lip gloss, daily planners, and training seminars. Likewise, popular press texts for women routinely argue that individual women are directly responsible for their own successes or failures at work (e.g., Mindell, 1995). In these popular texts, the entrepreneurial subject is thought to add value to organizational products and services (Nadesan, 1999). Here, the seemingly “real” self is the self that is developing, growing, and becoming a better, more successful person.

Authors: Tracy, Sarah. and Trethewey, Angela.
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Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy
11
It should be noted that the discourse of managerialism can be articulated and enacted by
any and all organizational members, “owners, workers, and society—and defines a place for each
of these groups” (Deetz, 1992, p. 222). Therefore, while managerialism promotes a certain
subject position and a particular set of interests, identity is not necessarily imposed upon workers;
employees take an active, strategic role in their acceptance of organizationally-preferred selves
(Deetz, 1998; Tracy, 2000). Nevertheless, identity is largely created in relation to managerialist
discourses that encompass an organizationally-prescribed ideal, a process that produces specific
outcomes including an organizationally-defined self that comes to be understood and experienced
as “real” and of our own choosing.
Entrepreneurialism is another pervasive discourse of power that hails a “preferred”
organizational/cultural subject. The “entrepreneurial self” (Miller & Rose, 1990) or the
“enterprising subject” (du Gay, 1996) is responsible and actively engaged in creating a new and
better self. The entrepreneurial worker is depicted as “an enterprising individual in search of
meaning, responsibility, and a sense of personal achievement in life, and hence in work” (Miller
& Rose, 1995, p. 454). Entrepreneurialism's subject is the “active, self-motivated individual,
accepting responsibility for its own fate, keen to identify clearly its aims and desires, to remove
barriers to its fulfillment, to monitor success in realizing them” (Keat & Abercrombie, 1991, p.
11). The discourse of entrepreneurialism is invoked in the self-help and success literature,
particularly in texts aimed at working women (Nadesan & Trethewey, 2000). Myriad ads
encourage women, to become their “best self” (whether that is the best sex-object or best career
woman) through the use of products such as food processors, lip gloss, daily planners, and
training seminars. Likewise, popular press texts for women routinely argue that individual women
are directly responsible for their own successes or failures at work (e.g., Mindell, 1995). In these
popular texts, the entrepreneurial subject is thought to add value to organizational products and
services (Nadesan, 1999). Here, the seemingly “real” self is the self that is developing, growing,
and becoming a better, more successful person.


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