All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fracturing the Real-Self<-->Fake-Self Dichotomy: Moving Toward “Crystallized” Organizational Discourses and Identities
Unformatted Document Text:  Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy 14 (Trethewey, 2001, p. 214). Given the discursive constructions of the “preferred” self who is committed to developing his/her identity in the context of work, it is not surprising that many workers find “real” “self-satisfaction, well-being, high-spirits and work [to be] inextricably linked” (Hochschild, 1997, p. 42). While the preferred subject position is seemingly productive for individuals, we should look carefully at how it constrains organizational members, their families, organizations, and the larger culture. When one's “best” or most “real” self is reserved for work, then non-work relations and activities come to be seen as oppositional or an interference. Both Deetz (1998) and Hochschild (1997) make clear that employees are not concerned that their employers want more from them; rather, they are concerned that their families, their bodies, their social obligations, or any other demands prevent them from doing “more work better” (Deetz, 1998, p. 66). As a result, potential and useful conflicts over the relative importance of employees' competing demands and identities (e.g., parent or community member) are suppressed, evaded or deferred. Indeed, a second way of “real-izing” the preferred identity is through the creation of a perpetually-deferred self. For example, Hochschild (1997) reported that many Amerco employees were frustrated by their inabilities to “balance” home life and work life, but were simultaneously unwilling to give up time at work. So, they simply created an imagined, but never realized future in which they might be able to take their children “camping in the Poconos” (p. 236). This imagined, “potential” self believes that the “pay-offs from such demanding work can enrich one's outside life, but this is consigned to an ever-receding future” (Deetz, 1998, p. 166). “The employee strategizes the self toward increases in power and money, but since these are themselves simply more instrumental means and not ends, the quest is never complete. The future is deferred and the quest endless” (Deetz, 1998, p. 164). In this cycle, families and communities are left with “deferred” lives, as well. Childcare is increasingly “outsourced” (Schor, 1992) and community and civic engagement has been steadily declining (Putnam, 1995). And while organizations may appear to benefit from members' acceptance of the organizationally-specified

Authors: Tracy, Sarah. and Trethewey, Angela.
first   previous   Page 14 of 30   next   last



background image
Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy
14
(Trethewey, 2001, p. 214). Given the discursive constructions of the “preferred” self who is
committed to developing his/her identity in the context of work, it is not surprising that many
workers find “real” “self-satisfaction, well-being, high-spirits and work [to be] inextricably
linked” (Hochschild, 1997, p. 42).
While the preferred subject position is seemingly productive for individuals, we should
look carefully at how it constrains organizational members, their families, organizations, and the
larger culture. When one's “best” or most “real” self is reserved for work, then non-work relations
and activities come to be seen as oppositional or an interference. Both Deetz (1998) and
Hochschild (1997) make clear that employees are not concerned that their employers want more
from them; rather, they are concerned that their families, their bodies, their social obligations, or
any other demands prevent them from doing “more work better” (Deetz, 1998, p. 66). As a result,
potential and useful conflicts over the relative importance of employees' competing demands and
identities (e.g., parent or community member) are suppressed, evaded or deferred.
Indeed, a second way of “real-izing” the preferred identity is through the creation of a
perpetually-deferred self. For example, Hochschild (1997) reported that many Amerco
employees were frustrated by their inabilities to “balance” home life and work life, but were
simultaneously unwilling to give up time at work. So, they simply created an imagined, but never
realized future in which they might be able to take their children “camping in the Poconos” (p.
236). This imagined, “potential” self believes that the “pay-offs from such demanding work can
enrich one's outside life, but this is consigned to an ever-receding future” (Deetz, 1998, p. 166).
“The employee strategizes the self toward increases in power and money, but since these are
themselves simply more instrumental means and not ends, the quest is never complete. The future
is deferred and the quest endless” (Deetz, 1998, p. 164). In this cycle, families and communities
are left with “deferred” lives, as well. Childcare is increasingly “outsourced” (Schor, 1992) and
community and civic engagement has been steadily declining (Putnam, 1995). And while
organizations may appear to benefit from members' acceptance of the organizationally-specified


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.