All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Fracturing the Real-Self<-->Fake-Self Dichotomy: Moving Toward Crystallized Organizational Discourses and Identities
Unformatted Document Text:  Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy 21 is multi-dimensional; the more facets, the more beautiful and complex. Just as crystals have differing forms, depending upon whether they grow rapidly or slowly, under constant or fluctuating conditions, or from highly variable or remarkably uniform fluids or gases, crystallized selves have different shapes depending on the various discourses through which it is constructed and constrained. We suggest, somewhat boldly, that a crystallized self is stronger, more beautiful, more productive for a variety of (political) purposes and downright better than a planar self, flattened and suffocated by all-encompassing managerialist ideologies. In doing so, we understand that we are reproducing the managerialist terminology (e.g., “productive”) that we have just critiqued. To this, we cede that we are bound by discourses and their attendant sedimented vocabularies and meanings (Berger & Luckmann, 1967; Weedon, 1997). Despite the fact that our very language is imbued with notions of managerialism and entrepreneurialism, we would argue that through appropriating terms for alternate purposes, and playing with them in ways that may seem initially awkward, we enact (potentially transformative) resistance. We have provided a normative and moral argument urging people to construct multi- dimensional crystallized selves. The question remains, how do they do so? First, we encourage people to play with language. Through appropriating taken-for-granted and routinized language and responses, we might achieve provocative and evocative ends. We were reminded of the potential power of this practice when a friend of ours recently bemoaned the frequent cocktail party question, “What do you do?” He, however gently, pointed to the superficiality of the question since people are “more than their jobs.” Indeed, even the seemingly transparent word “do” has been largely colonized by notions of commodified productivity (du Gay, 1996). Could we not just as easily respond to a question of, “What do you do?” with an answer such as, “I bake. I volunteer. I play football.” Similarly, rather than privileging “work” as the only “productive” realm of our everyday experience, we might begin to elevate our lives and selves along side or that intersect with work—whether that be our lives of home (Hochschild, 1997)

Authors: Tracy, Sarah. and Trethewey, Angela.
first   previous   Page 21 of 30   next   last



background image
Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy
21
is multi-dimensional; the more facets, the more beautiful and complex. Just as crystals have
differing forms, depending upon whether they grow rapidly or slowly, under constant or
fluctuating conditions, or from highly variable or remarkably uniform fluids or gases, crystallized
selves have different shapes depending on the various discourses through which it is constructed
and constrained.
We suggest, somewhat boldly, that a crystallized self is stronger, more beautiful, more
productive for a variety of (political) purposes and downright better than a planar self, flattened
and suffocated by all-encompassing managerialist ideologies. In doing so, we understand that we
are reproducing the managerialist terminology (e.g., “productive”) that we have just critiqued. To
this, we cede that we are bound by discourses and their attendant sedimented vocabularies and
meanings (Berger & Luckmann, 1967; Weedon, 1997). Despite the fact that our very language is
imbued with notions of managerialism and entrepreneurialism, we would argue that through
appropriating terms for alternate purposes, and playing with them in ways that may seem initially
awkward, we enact (potentially transformative) resistance.
We have provided a normative and moral argument urging people to construct multi-
dimensional crystallized selves. The question remains, how do they do so? First, we encourage
people to play with language. Through appropriating taken-for-granted and routinized language
and responses, we might achieve provocative and evocative ends. We were reminded of the
potential power of this practice when a friend of ours recently bemoaned the frequent cocktail
party question, “What do you do?” He, however gently, pointed to the superficiality of the
question since people are “more than their jobs.” Indeed, even the seemingly transparent word
“do” has been largely colonized by notions of commodified productivity (du Gay, 1996). Could
we not just as easily respond to a question of, “What do you do?” with an answer such as, “I
bake. I volunteer. I play football.” Similarly, rather than privileging “work” as the only
“productive” realm of our everyday experience, we might begin to elevate our lives and selves
along side or that intersect with work—whether that be our lives of home (Hochschild, 1997)


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 21 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.