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Fracturing the Real-Self<-->Fake-Self Dichotomy: Moving Toward Crystallized Organizational Discourses and Identities
Unformatted Document Text:  Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy 22 community (Ashcraft & Kedrowicz, 2002) or leisure (Schor, 1992). For example, when one of us leaves the office to go home to care for her toddler, she might say, “I have to go do ‘home’.” Or, rather than bemoaning the fact that “I didn’t get any work done this weekend,” we might explain, “I did so much family this weekend” or “I deepened my friendships on Saturday.” And, at parties, we might ask people questions, inspired by critical theorists (Deetz, 1992), such as, “What are your interests?” or even “Whose interests do you support?” We should note, though, that when one of the authors tried this strategy at a recent Halloween party, another party-goer crinkled his nose, and mumbled something like, “Buzz kill,” before he wandered over to the hummus dip. Anyway, we digress. Suffice it to say, we encourage people to play with everyday language, and by doing so, construct alternate understandings of self and identity. Second, we encourage our audience to play with the idea of edges, and emphasize the importance of constructing different angles of repose. We suspect that to see ourselves in different ways, we must place ourselves in various situations with various textures. In a move inspired by Weick’s (1979) treatment of action as raw material for new meanings as well as his demand to “Complicate yourself!” (p. 261), we suggest that people place themselves in locations and situations in which they are uncomfortable and decidedly non-expert. Doing so need not be dramatic. In a conversation between the two authors, one relayed the following story, which may serve to illustrate: Last weekend I went to Mexico with two work friends and four others whom I didn’t know, including two children. I brought a lot of class reading and assignments that needed grading with me, and planned on spending four to five hours each day working. When I brought out my papers and readings, one of the new acquaintances kept telling me things like, “You’re not allowed to work” and “What are you doing?” I thought to myself, “leave me alone…can’t you see this is more important.” At the same time though, I started feeling guilty. Working toward tenure was not of value within the discourse of this weekend “vacation.” The valued activities were playing in the surf,

Authors: Tracy, Sarah. and Trethewey, Angela.
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Real-SelfÅÆFake-Self Dichotomy
22
community (Ashcraft & Kedrowicz, 2002) or leisure (Schor, 1992). For example, when one of us
leaves the office to go home to care for her toddler, she might say, “I have to go do ‘home’.” Or,
rather than bemoaning the fact that “I didn’t get any work done this weekend,” we might explain,
“I did so much family this weekend” or “I deepened my friendships on Saturday.” And, at parties,
we might ask people questions, inspired by critical theorists (Deetz, 1992), such as, “What are
your interests?” or even “Whose interests do you support?” We should note, though, that when
one of the authors tried this strategy at a recent Halloween party, another party-goer crinkled his
nose, and mumbled something like, “Buzz kill,” before he wandered over to the hummus dip.
Anyway, we digress. Suffice it to say, we encourage people to play with everyday language, and
by doing so, construct alternate understandings of self and identity.
Second, we encourage our audience to play with the idea of edges, and emphasize the
importance of constructing different angles of repose. We suspect that to see ourselves in
different ways, we must place ourselves in various situations with various textures. In a move
inspired by Weick’s (1979) treatment of action as raw material for new meanings as well as his
demand to “Complicate yourself!” (p. 261), we suggest that people place themselves in locations
and situations in which they are uncomfortable and decidedly non-expert. Doing so need not be
dramatic. In a conversation between the two authors, one relayed the following story, which may
serve to illustrate:
Last weekend I went to Mexico with two work friends and four others whom I didn’t
know, including two children. I brought a lot of class reading and assignments that
needed grading with me, and planned on spending four to five hours each day working.
When I brought out my papers and readings, one of the new acquaintances kept telling
me things like, “You’re not allowed to work” and “What are you doing?” I thought to
myself, “leave me alone…can’t you see this is more important.” At the same time
though, I started feeling guilty. Working toward tenure was not of value within the
discourse of this weekend “vacation.” The valued activities were playing in the surf,


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