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Young People, Media Use, and Voter Turnout: An Analysis of the 2000 National Election Study
Unformatted Document Text:  Young Voters and Media Use 5 More recently, Simon and Merrill (1993) confirmed the findings of earlier studies. They examined media use and voter turnout by using data from a two-part election race in Arizona and found that television was used as a primary news source for all levels of the electorate. However, the authors of this study reported that voters who followed politics closely strongly preferred newspaper coverage for campaign news. Weaver and Drew (1991, 1993, 1995, 1998, 2001) have provided a comprehensive picture of the impact of media use on voters. In their series of survey studies among adult residents in Indiana during various election years, they found (1) that radio news, television ads and regional newspapers were significant sources of information about the candidates’ stands on issues (2) that debate viewing, education, and campaign interest were significant predictors of knowledge about the candidates’ stands on issues and (3) that attention to newspaper coverage of the election and campaign interest were both predictors of the likelihood of voting. Chaffee, Zhao, and Leshner (1994) confirmed the findings of Weaver and Drew’s studies in two voter surveys done in two different states during the 1992 campaign year. Chaffee et al. compared the contributions of various media uses to voter knowledge and found that television news viewing contributed to an increase in voter knowledge about issue differences between the candidates; newspaper reading increased voters’ knowledge about policy differences between the two major parties. Rosenberg and Elliot (1992) provided further information about voters. They found that issue-oriented voters (those who are concerned about comparing issue positions among candidates) tend to rely on newspapers, and image-oriented voters (those who rely on a candidate’s personal qualities and images) depend on television news.

Authors: Kim, Eunsong.
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Young Voters and Media Use
5
More recently, Simon and Merrill (1993) confirmed the findings of earlier
studies. They examined media use and voter turnout by using data from a two-part
election race in Arizona and found that television was used as a primary news source for
all levels of the electorate. However, the authors of this study reported that voters who
followed politics closely strongly preferred newspaper coverage for campaign news.
Weaver and Drew (1991, 1993, 1995, 1998, 2001) have provided a
comprehensive picture of the impact of media use on voters. In their series of survey
studies among adult residents in Indiana during various election years, they found (1)
that radio news, television ads and regional newspapers were significant sources of
information about the candidates’ stands on issues (2) that debate viewing, education,
and campaign interest were significant predictors of knowledge about the candidates’
stands on issues and (3) that attention to newspaper coverage of the election and
campaign interest were both predictors of the likelihood of voting.
Chaffee, Zhao, and Leshner (1994) confirmed the findings of Weaver and
Drew’s studies in two voter surveys done in two different states during the 1992
campaign year. Chaffee et al. compared the contributions of various media uses to voter
knowledge and found that television news viewing contributed to an increase in voter
knowledge about issue differences between the candidates; newspaper reading increased
voters’ knowledge about policy differences between the two major parties.
Rosenberg and Elliot (1992) provided further information about voters. They
found that issue-oriented voters (those who are concerned about comparing issue
positions among candidates) tend to rely on newspapers, and image-oriented voters
(those who rely on a candidate’s personal qualities and images) depend on television
news.


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