All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Young People, Media Use, and Voter Turnout: An Analysis of the 2000 National Election Study
Unformatted Document Text:  Young Voters and Media Use 6 Lowden, Andersen, Dozier, and Lauzen (1994) extended this finding by including the concept of electability, ‘the likelihood of a candidate winning the presidential election (p.295).’ Lowden et al. reported that issue-oriented voters sought image information from television if the candidates’ electability was also important. However, in this study, image-oriented voters used television as their source for both kinds of information, if electability was important to them. Young voters, however, appear to be different from other age groups both in their media use and in their political activities (Buckingham, 1999; Hout and Knoke, 1975; Lewis, 2001; Peiser, 2000; Simon and Merrill, 1997). Scholars have found that the younger generation was generally more inclined than earlier cohorts to rely on television to obtain political information and less interested in reading newspapers (Brody, 1990; Cobb-Walgren, 1990; Comstock et al., 1978; Fidler, 1997). The findings of Peiser’s (2000) study are particularly interesting in this context. The author compared cohort trends in media use in the United States with that of a European country, Germany. He found that the American television generation, but not the German counterpart, developed a closer relation with television than the preceding cohorts, and the increased television viewing among the television generation had a negative relationship with newspaper reading. He further argued that “growing up under heavy exposure to television or growing up with commercial television (p.203)” might have been the reason why this pattern appears only in the U.S., not in Germany. Many studies have documented young people’s declining interest in news media and increasing interest in entertainment media (Cullingford, 1992; Buckingham, 1996; Walker, 1996). Studies have argued that traditional notions of citizenship such as social interaction and community life are no longer relevant among young people

Authors: Kim, Eunsong.
first   previous   Page 6 of 22   next   last



background image
Young Voters and Media Use
6
Lowden, Andersen, Dozier, and Lauzen (1994) extended this finding by
including the concept of electability, ‘the likelihood of a candidate winning the
presidential election (p.295).’ Lowden et al. reported that issue-oriented voters sought
image information from television if the candidates’ electability was also important.
However, in this study, image-oriented voters used television as their source for both
kinds of information, if electability was important to them.
Young voters, however, appear to be different from other age groups both in
their media use and in their political activities (Buckingham, 1999; Hout and Knoke,
1975; Lewis, 2001; Peiser, 2000; Simon and Merrill, 1997). Scholars have found that
the younger generation was generally more inclined than earlier cohorts to rely on
television to obtain political information and less interested in reading newspapers
(Brody, 1990; Cobb-Walgren, 1990; Comstock et al., 1978; Fidler, 1997).
The findings of Peiser’s (2000) study are particularly interesting in this context.
The author compared cohort trends in media use in the United States with that of a
European country, Germany. He found that the American television generation, but not
the German counterpart, developed a closer relation with television than the preceding
cohorts, and the increased television viewing among the television generation had a
negative relationship with newspaper reading. He further argued that “growing up under
heavy exposure to television or growing up with commercial television (p.203)” might
have been the reason why this pattern appears only in the U.S., not in Germany.
Many studies have documented young people’s declining interest in news
media and increasing interest in entertainment media (Cullingford, 1992; Buckingham,
1996; Walker, 1996). Studies have argued that traditional notions of citizenship such as
social interaction and community life are no longer relevant among young people


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.