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Young People, Media Use, and Voter Turnout: An Analysis of the 2000 National Election Study
Unformatted Document Text:  Young Voters and Media Use 9 The dependent variable of this study was whether or not respondents voted in November 2000 measured using a nominal level variable, “Did the respondent vote? 3 ” To examine the effect of media use on young people’s voting behavior while holding demographic factors and attitudinal influence constant, this study used hierarchical multiple regression and entered the predictor variables in four blocks. The significance of changes each block produced in the R square was examined and, if a block produced a significant change, then the regression coefficient (beta) was looked at to determine the contributions of the individual variables in explaining the variance of the dependent variable. The four sets of predictors utilized in this study were demographics, political attitudes, interpersonal communication, and media use measures. The demographic predictors included age, gender, race, education, and income. Gender 4 and race 5 variables were recoded to be used as ordinal level variables in the regression function. Second, the political attitude predictor group had four predictors: party membership, strength of partisanship, campaign interest, and political efficacy. Party membership was whether a respondent was a Republican, a Democrat, or an Independent. This variable 6 was recoded to be used as an ordinal variable in the regression function. Strength of partisanship was a variable measuring how strongly a respondent felt he or she is a Republican, a Democrat, or an Independent. This variable 7 3 Voting (v1241): “In talking to people about elections, we often find that a lot of people were not able to vote because they weren’t registered, they were sick, or they just didn’t have time. How about you – did you vote in the elections this November?” This nominal level variable was recoded (0: no, I didn’t vote, else; 1: yes, I did vote) so that it can be considered as an ordinal level variable in the regression function. 4 Gender (v1029) was recoded (else:0, male:1) 5 Race (v1030) was recoded (else:0, white:1) 6 Party membership (v519) was recoded (else:0, Republican:1) 7 Strength of partisanship (v523) was recoded (1(strong Democrat) to 7 (strong Republican))

Authors: Kim, Eunsong.
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Young Voters and Media Use
9
The dependent variable of this study was whether or not respondents voted in
November 2000 measured using a nominal level variable, “Did the respondent vote?
3
To examine the effect of media use on young people’s voting behavior while holding
demographic factors and attitudinal influence constant, this study used hierarchical
multiple regression and entered the predictor variables in four blocks. The significance
of changes each block produced in the R square was examined and, if a block produced
a significant change, then the regression coefficient (beta) was looked at to determine
the contributions of the individual variables in explaining the variance of the dependent
variable.
The four sets of predictors utilized in this study were demographics, political
attitudes, interpersonal communication, and media use measures. The demographic
predictors included age, gender, race, education, and income. Gender
4
and race
5
variables were recoded to be used as ordinal level variables in the regression function.
Second, the political attitude predictor group had four predictors: party
membership, strength of partisanship, campaign interest, and political efficacy. Party
membership was whether a respondent was a Republican, a Democrat, or an
Independent. This variable
6
was recoded to be used as an ordinal variable in the
regression function. Strength of partisanship was a variable measuring how strongly a
respondent felt he or she is a Republican, a Democrat, or an Independent. This variable
7
3
Voting (v1241): “In talking to people about elections, we often find that a lot of people were
not able to vote because they weren’t registered, they were sick, or they just didn’t have time.
How about you – did you vote in the elections this November?” This nominal level variable was
recoded (0: no, I didn’t vote, else; 1: yes, I did vote) so that it can be considered as an ordinal
level variable in the regression function.
4
Gender (v1029) was recoded (else:0, male:1)
5
Race (v1030) was recoded (else:0, white:1)
6
Party membership (v519) was recoded (else:0, Republican:1)
7
Strength of partisanship (v523) was recoded (1(strong Democrat) to 7 (strong Republican))


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