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Relationship Orientation, Jealousy, and Equity: An Examination of Jealousy Evoking and Positive Communicative Responses
Unformatted Document Text:  Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 3 jealousy has received little attention. Communicative and behavioral responses to feeling jealousy have been the primary focus of research. This research proposes that individuals may intentionally and strategically use communication to evoke jealousy (in both exchange and communal relationship orientations) when feeling deprived or angry, as a way to restore balance in romantic relationships. Jealousy Teismann and Mosher (1978) define jealousy as “an emotional state of an actor, consisting of fear and anger and based on a subjective appraisal of a threat or loss of some aspect of a highly valued relationship with a partner to a rival” (p. 1211). They examined which types of acts were used in jealousy situations (responses to feeling jealous), finding that participants used more rejecting and coercive acts compared to fewer cognitive, appealing, reconciling, and resolving acts in jealous conditions. The results supported the idea that jealousy conflict has a resolution-resistant nature. Results for gender analyses suggest that males experience jealousy in terms of sex issues and females experience jealousy concerning issues of time and attention loss. Salovey and Rodin (1984) found that greater social-comparison jealousy stemmed from receiving negative feedback on performance of a characteristic in which the other performed successfully. For example, individuals might tell their partner that they never listen and that the “rival” person always listens. The individual’s self-esteem (not being as competent as the rival) and the quality of the relationship are threatened as a result of the negative feedback and comparison. Once the quality of the relationship is threatened, relational uncertainty becomes a factor. Afifi and Reichert (1986) studied relational uncertainty with regard to predicting jealousy experience and expression. Afifi and Reichert hypothesized that experience of jealousy in dating

Authors: Cayanus, Jacob. and Booth-Butterfield, Melanie.
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Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 3
jealousy has received little attention. Communicative and behavioral responses to feeling
jealousy have been the primary focus of research. This research proposes that individuals may
intentionally and strategically use communication to evoke jealousy (in both exchange and
communal relationship orientations) when feeling deprived or angry, as a way to restore balance
in romantic relationships.
Jealousy
Teismann and Mosher (1978) define jealousy as “an emotional state of an actor,
consisting of fear and anger and based on a subjective appraisal of a threat or loss of some aspect
of a highly valued relationship with a partner to a rival” (p. 1211). They examined which types
of acts were used in jealousy situations (responses to feeling jealous), finding that participants
used more rejecting and coercive acts compared to fewer cognitive, appealing, reconciling, and
resolving acts in jealous conditions. The results supported the idea that jealousy conflict has a
resolution-resistant nature. Results for gender analyses suggest that males experience jealousy in
terms of sex issues and females experience jealousy concerning issues of time and attention loss.
Salovey and Rodin (1984) found that greater social-comparison jealousy stemmed from
receiving negative feedback on performance of a characteristic in which the other performed
successfully. For example, individuals might tell their partner that they never listen and that the
“rival” person always listens. The individual’s self-esteem (not being as competent as the rival)
and the quality of the relationship are threatened as a result of the negative feedback and
comparison.
Once the quality of the relationship is threatened, relational uncertainty becomes a factor.
Afifi and Reichert (1986) studied relational uncertainty with regard to predicting jealousy
experience and expression. Afifi and Reichert hypothesized that experience of jealousy in dating


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