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Relationship Orientation, Jealousy, and Equity: An Examination of Jealousy Evoking and Positive Communicative Responses
Unformatted Document Text:  Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 4 relationships is positively related to levels of relational state uncertainty and that direct expression of jealousy will be negatively related to relational state uncertainty levels. Results suggested that participants were likely to experience jealousy, an inequitable state, but not express jealousy at high levels of relational state uncertainty; e.g., not knowing if the partner is committed to the relationship. Guerrero et al. (1995) focused on communicative responses and behaviors that individuals use to help cope with jealousy. A communicative response was defined as “a behavioral reaction to jealousy that carries communicative value and has the potential to fulfill individual and relational goals” (p. 272). Six interactive responses (active distancing, negative affect expression, integrative communication, distributive communication, avoidance/ denial, and violent communication/threats) to jealousy were identified. Guerrero et al. also identified five general behavioral responses to jealousy (Surveillance/Restriction, Compensatory Restoration, Manipulation Attempts, Rival Contacts, and Violent Behavior). Andersen and Eloy (1995) examined jealousy and relational satisfaction using the communicative responses identified by Guerrero et al. (1995). Results suggested the communicative responses distributive communication, active distancing, expression of negative affect, violent communication/threats, and avoidance/denial, were all related negatively to relational satisfaction. Integrative communication was not related to relational satisfaction. Communicative responses to jealousy, both positive and negative, were found to be more predictive of relational satisfaction compared to jealousy experience. Guerrero and Afifi (1999) contend that communicative responses to jealousy in romantic relationships fill critical functions. Some of these functions are preserving one’s self-esteem, maintaining the relationship, restoring equity through retaliation, and reducing uncertainty about

Authors: Cayanus, Jacob. and Booth-Butterfield, Melanie.
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Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 4
relationships is positively related to levels of relational state uncertainty and that direct
expression of jealousy will be negatively related to relational state uncertainty levels. Results
suggested that participants were likely to experience jealousy, an inequitable state, but not
express jealousy at high levels of relational state uncertainty; e.g., not knowing if the partner is
committed to the relationship.
Guerrero et al. (1995) focused on communicative responses and behaviors that
individuals use to help cope with jealousy. A communicative response was defined as “a
behavioral reaction to jealousy that carries communicative value and has the potential to fulfill
individual and relational goals” (p. 272). Six interactive responses (active distancing, negative
affect expression, integrative communication, distributive communication, avoidance/ denial,
and violent communication/threats) to jealousy were identified. Guerrero et al. also identified
five general behavioral responses to jealousy (Surveillance/Restriction, Compensatory
Restoration, Manipulation Attempts, Rival Contacts, and Violent Behavior).
Andersen and Eloy (1995) examined jealousy and relational satisfaction using the
communicative responses identified by Guerrero et al. (1995). Results suggested the
communicative responses distributive communication, active distancing, expression of
negative affect, violent communication/threats, and avoidance/denial, were all related negatively
to relational satisfaction. Integrative communication was not related to relational satisfaction.
Communicative responses to jealousy, both positive and negative, were found to be more
predictive of relational satisfaction compared to jealousy experience.
Guerrero and Afifi (1999) contend that communicative responses to jealousy in romantic
relationships fill critical functions. Some of these functions are preserving one’s self-esteem,
maintaining the relationship, restoring equity through retaliation, and reducing uncertainty about


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