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Relationship Orientation, Jealousy, and Equity: An Examination of Jealousy Evoking and Positive Communicative Responses
Unformatted Document Text:  Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 6 aware of their partner’s needs and expect the same from their partners. Making the partner jealous could be used as a way to have those needs met (e.g., explaining feelings) if the partner is not being responsive. Relationship Orientation Perceptions of reciprocity vary between individuals in relationships. Buunk, Doosje, Jans, and Hopstaken (1993) suggested that individual characteristics moderate perceptions of the effects that reciprocity has on relational well-being. Two characteristics related to expectation of reciprocity are exchange orientation and communal orientation. Exchange Orientation Murstein et al. (1977) proposed that exchange orientation referred to the personality disposition of individuals who expect reciprocity concerning rewards (e.g., gifts, services). Individuals who are exchange oriented expect rewards of equal value after a reward has been given. When rewards or benefits are received and the individual cannot reciprocate, negative feelings tend to develop (over-benefit). Also, when rewards are given and the individual does not receive a reward of equal value in return, negative feelings develop (under-benefit). Murstein et al. (1977) hypothesized that individuals with a high exchange orientation do not believe that interpersonal needs differ and that having a communal orientation would harm close relationships. Their results supported the hypothesis suggesting relationship orientation has an effect on dissatisfaction in relationships. Similarly, Clark and Mills (1979) describe an exchange orientation as one in which members give benefits (anything received that is of use) expecting benefits in return. When an individual receives a benefit (e.g., emotional support) he/she becomes indebted until a comparable benefit is returned. Each individual in the relationship is concerned with the amount

Authors: Cayanus, Jacob. and Booth-Butterfield, Melanie.
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Relationship Orientation and Jealousy 6
aware of their partner’s needs and expect the same from their partners. Making the partner
jealous could be used as a way to have those needs met (e.g., explaining feelings) if the partner is
not being responsive.
Relationship Orientation
Perceptions of reciprocity vary between individuals in relationships. Buunk, Doosje,
Jans, and Hopstaken (1993) suggested that individual characteristics moderate perceptions of the
effects that reciprocity has on relational well-being. Two characteristics related to expectation of
reciprocity are exchange orientation and communal orientation.
Exchange Orientation
Murstein et al. (1977) proposed that exchange orientation referred to the personality
disposition of individuals who expect reciprocity concerning rewards (e.g., gifts, services).
Individuals who are exchange oriented expect rewards of equal value after a reward has been
given. When rewards or benefits are received and the individual cannot reciprocate, negative
feelings tend to develop (over-benefit). Also, when rewards are given and the individual does
not receive a reward of equal value in return, negative feelings develop (under-benefit).
Murstein et al. (1977) hypothesized that individuals with a high exchange orientation do not
believe that interpersonal needs differ and that having a communal orientation would harm close
relationships. Their results supported the hypothesis suggesting relationship orientation has an
effect on dissatisfaction in relationships.
Similarly, Clark and Mills (1979) describe an exchange orientation as one in which
members give benefits (anything received that is of use) expecting benefits in return. When an
individual receives a benefit (e.g., emotional support) he/she becomes indebted until a
comparable benefit is returned. Each individual in the relationship is concerned with the amount


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