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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the “Battle of Seattle” to the “War on Terrorism” in The New York Times: Framing Protests Against Globalization A B S T R A C T This content analysis of New York Times coverage explores the evolution of journalistic framing of the “anti-globalization” movement from 1999, when thousands of protestors in Seattle disrupted a trade meeting, until the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks in 2002. It finds that the 1999 demonstrations definitively put this movement on the newspaper’s agenda and that over a three-year period movement visibility did not increase, use of official sources decreased slightly, and Seattle endured as a symbolic reference. While portrayals of the movement and its members shifted in complex ways, the traditional “protest paradigm” emphasizing violence and deviance persists; however, this analysis suggests that the movement was further mainstreamed—rather than newly marginalized—after September 11, 2001. The results suggest that coverage of dissent is driven more by news values such as novelty, violence, and local bias than by ideological, intellectual or professional learning curves among journalists.

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the “Battle of Seattle” to the “War on Terrorism” in The New York Times:
Framing Protests Against Globalization
A B S T R A C T
This content analysis of New York Times coverage explores the evolution of journalistic framing
of the “anti-globalization” movement from 1999, when thousands of protestors in Seattle
disrupted a trade meeting, until the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks in 2002. It finds
that the 1999 demonstrations definitively put this movement on the newspaper’s agenda and that
over a three-year period movement visibility did not increase, use of official sources decreased
slightly, and Seattle endured as a symbolic reference. While portrayals of the movement and its
members shifted in complex ways, the traditional “protest paradigm” emphasizing violence and
deviance persists; however, this analysis suggests that the movement was further
mainstreamed—rather than newly marginalized—after September 11, 2001. The results suggest
that coverage of dissent is driven more by news values such as novelty, violence, and local bias
than by ideological, intellectual or professional learning curves among journalists.


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