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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 10 10 and corrected any omissions or errors in the previous coding. A third researcher recalculated the tallies for each category before entering the final, corrected tallies into the computer database. Instrument: The primary coding unit was the story. Each story was classified according to characteristics of the protest paradigm in the following categories: visibility, references to event locations, sources used, positive descriptions of the movement, negative descriptions of its members, and valence of protest event description. Visibility: The visibility of the newspaper’s representations of the anti-globalization movement was measured in terms of attention (total number of stories), prominence (placement of story on section front pages), and presence of graphics and/or photographs. The length of each story was not counted, since nearly all of these New York Times articles were relatively long; however, in some cases only a small portion of the article dealt explicitly with the anti- globalization movement. Intercoder reliability for this category was 99 percent. Event locations: Each reference made to a city (Seattle, Davos, Quebec City, Washington D.C., Prague, Genoa, New York City, Doha, etc.) as a location of past, present or future protests and/or terrorist activities in the headline, dateline, text, or captions was coded. Intercoder reliability for this category was 100 percent. Sources used: The affiliation of each source quoted directly or indirectly was coded in one of three categories: “establishment” (government, police, trade organization, or business/industry officials); “movement members” (protest participants/organizers; members of religious, student, environmental, labor, humanitarian or other advocacy groups; celebrity supporters); and “others” (the media, academics, experts, authors). Sources were coded by the sentence or, in the case of lists, sentence fragment. Intercoder reliability for this category was 99 percent.

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 10
10
and corrected any omissions or errors in the previous coding. A third researcher recalculated the
tallies for each category before entering the final, corrected tallies into the computer database.
Instrument: The primary coding unit was the story. Each story was classified according to
characteristics of the protest paradigm in the following categories: visibility, references to event
locations, sources used, positive descriptions of the movement, negative descriptions of its
members, and valence of protest event description.
Visibility: The visibility of the newspaper’s representations of the anti-globalization
movement was measured in terms of attention (total number of stories), prominence (placement
of story on section front pages), and presence of graphics and/or photographs. The length of each
story was not counted, since nearly all of these New York Times articles were relatively long;
however, in some cases only a small portion of the article dealt explicitly with the anti-
globalization movement. Intercoder reliability for this category was 99 percent.
Event locations: Each reference made to a city (Seattle, Davos, Quebec City, Washington
D.C., Prague, Genoa, New York City, Doha, etc.) as a location of past, present or future protests
and/or terrorist activities in the headline, dateline, text, or captions was coded. Intercoder
reliability for this category was 100 percent.
Sources used: The affiliation of each source quoted directly or indirectly was coded in
one of three categories: “establishment” (government, police, trade organization, or
business/industry officials); “movement members” (protest participants/organizers; members of
religious, student, environmental, labor, humanitarian or other advocacy groups; celebrity
supporters); and “others” (the media, academics, experts, authors). Sources were coded by the
sentence or, in the case of lists, sentence fragment. Intercoder reliability for this category was 99
percent.


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