All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 11 11 Positive descriptors of movement: This portion consisted of supportive, mainstreaming or legitimizing terms in reference to the movement’s influences, support and goals. Each occurrence was tallied. The “influence” category refers to acknowledged and applied effects of the protests on trade-talk participants, government officials, business executives, demonstrators, bystanders, and other individuals and groups throughout society (such as effective, well-financed, united, growing). The “support” category represents a count of every mention of individuals, large groups or organizations supporting the protests (churches, AFL-CIO, Greenpeace, student activists, The Ruckus Society, Ralph Nader, and so on), including repeats, but mentions of celebrity individuals were tallied only once per article. The “goals” category represents a tally of every mention of purported aims or issues of concern to some protesters or the anti-globalization movement (for instance, environmental protection, workers’ rights, debt forgiveness, social justice, living wages, government accountability, peace, immigration rights, civil liberties, sustainable development). Intercoder reliability for this category was 98 percent. Negative descriptors of members: Each occurrence of a diminishing, deviant or delegitimizing term in reference to movement members’ appearances, behaviors, attitudes or threats was counted. The “appearances” category represents a tally of mentions of such negative terms as masked, black-clad, tattooed or pierced, costumed. Negative “behavior” terms include, for example, fighting, window-smashing, spray-painting, getting arrested, looting. “Attitudes” include uncooperative, anarchist, angry, misinformed, naïve and the like. “Threats” coded for mentions of physical threats to individuals, groups, businesses, society or participants in trade meetings purported to be caused by the protesters or protest activities; this category includes references to physical dangers, the need for security, fears about personal safety or property

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
first   previous   Page 12 of 30   next   last



background image
From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 11
11
Positive descriptors of movement: This portion consisted of supportive, mainstreaming or
legitimizing terms in reference to the movement’s influences, support and goals. Each
occurrence was tallied. The “influence” category refers to acknowledged and applied effects of
the protests on trade-talk participants, government officials, business executives, demonstrators,
bystanders, and other individuals and groups throughout society (such as effective, well-financed,
united, growing). The “support” category represents a count of every mention of individuals,
large groups or organizations supporting the protests (churches, AFL-CIO, Greenpeace, student
activists, The Ruckus Society, Ralph Nader, and so on), including repeats, but mentions of
celebrity individuals were tallied only once per article. The “goals” category represents a tally of
every mention of purported aims or issues of concern to some protesters or the anti-globalization
movement (for instance, environmental protection, workers’ rights, debt forgiveness, social
justice, living wages, government accountability, peace, immigration rights, civil liberties,
sustainable development). Intercoder reliability for this category was 98 percent.
Negative descriptors of members: Each occurrence of a diminishing, deviant or
delegitimizing term in reference to movement members’ appearances, behaviors, attitudes or
threats was counted. The “appearances” category represents a tally of mentions of such negative
terms as masked, black-clad, tattooed or pierced, costumed. Negative “behavior” terms include,
for example, fighting, window-smashing, spray-painting, getting arrested, looting. “Attitudes”
include uncooperative, anarchist, angry, misinformed, naïve and the like. “Threats” coded for
mentions of physical threats to individuals, groups, businesses, society or participants in trade
meetings purported to be caused by the protesters or protest activities; this category includes
references to physical dangers, the need for security, fears about personal safety or property


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.