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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 13 13 Results A search of the NYT database turned up 362 stories in the three years from May 1, 1999, to April 30, 2002. After removal of duplicates and brief news summaries, a total of 192 stories representing the anti-globalization movement remained. As the bar graph in Figure 1 shows, the greatest concentrations of articles occurred in the 10-month period from the Seattle protests through the Washington, D.C., and Prague protests. Movement visibility then fell, only to rise again during the “Davos on the Hudson” events in January 2002. Figure 1 lists the numbers of stories, photographs, and front pages for each of the nine time periods that occurred during these three years. For convenience, the time periods are identified by the city in which the largest anti-globalization demonstrations took place. (Some smaller protests occurred at other locations associated with international trade or political meetings; when adjacent in time to one of the major IMF, World Bank, FTAA or WTO conferences, articles about such smaller meetings were included within the time period for the relevant major demonstration.) The first hypothesis asserted that the prominence of coverage of the anti-globalization movement in the New York Times would increase substantially from 1999 to 2002. In contrast with this expectation, Figure 1 shows no steady rise in the number of stories; in fact, the heavy solid line show a slight decline.The level of coverage increased only temporarily from 36 stories to 42 stories, in response to movement events immediately following the pivotal Seattle protest, then drops off until January 2002. A full 56 percent of the stories in this population ran in the year following. The relatively high number of stories—34—during the final four months of the study can be accounted for by the fact that protests against the World Economic Forum took

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 13
13
Results
A search of the NYT database turned up 362 stories in the three years from May 1, 1999,
to April 30, 2002. After removal of duplicates and brief news summaries, a total of 192 stories
representing the anti-globalization movement remained. As the bar graph in Figure 1 shows, the
greatest concentrations of articles occurred in the 10-month period from the Seattle protests
through the Washington, D.C., and Prague protests. Movement visibility then fell, only to rise
again during the “Davos on the Hudson” events in January 2002.
Figure 1 lists the numbers of stories, photographs, and front pages for each of the nine
time periods that occurred during these three years. For convenience, the time periods are
identified by the city in which the largest anti-globalization demonstrations took place. (Some
smaller protests occurred at other locations associated with international trade or political
meetings; when adjacent in time to one of the major IMF, World Bank, FTAA or WTO
conferences, articles about such smaller meetings were included within the time period for the
relevant major demonstration.)
The first hypothesis asserted that the prominence of coverage of the anti-globalization
movement in the New York Times would increase substantially from 1999 to 2002. In contrast
with this expectation, Figure 1 shows no steady rise in the number of stories; in fact, the heavy
solid line show a slight decline.The level of coverage increased only temporarily from 36 stories
to 42 stories, in response to movement events immediately following the pivotal Seattle protest,
then drops off until January 2002. A full 56 percent of the stories in this population ran in the
year following. The relatively high number of stories—34—during the final four months of the
study can be accounted for by the fact that protests against the World Economic Forum took


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