All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 14 14 place in Manhattan, the newspaper’s home turf, at that time. In addition, many celebrities and public figures participated in the New York events, thereby boosting perceived newsworthiness. Thus, a rise takes place in the short term but not in the long term. — insert Figure 1 here — The numbers of visual elements and of front-page placements follow a similar curve, dropping off within the year after Seattle and jumping back to high levels—42 photos and graphics, nine appearances on front pages— nearly two years later, when a protest occurred locally. One note of interest in this trend is that starting with Prague the visuals remain relatively more prominent than text; the number of photographs exceeds the number of stories in six of the nine time periods. For example, in the case of the “slow” time period for coverage surrounding Quebec City protests, just six stories were published along with 19 photos, tables or other graphic elements. While the number of photos rose slightly over time, the number of front pages stayed constant. The percentage of stories in each period that ran on a section front page ranged from 17 percent to 33 percent, and the proportion remained the same for New York as it had been for Seattle (26 percent). Even with the inclusion of New York, which presents a special geographic circumstance, the prominence of coverage of the anti-globalization movement does not increase substantially over the course of three years, when measured by a combination of quantity of stories, visual salience and placement. Hypothesis 1 must be rejected. It seems clear, however, that the 1999 demonstrations against the World Trade Organization put the anti-globalization movement on the journalists’ map, so to speak. Only one story was identified addressing this topic in the Times in the four months prior to Seattle, yet 191 stories—ranging from six to 42 per time period— were published in the 29 months following that watershed event.

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
first   previous   Page 15 of 30   next   last



background image
From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 14
14
place in Manhattan, the newspaper’s home turf, at that time. In addition, many celebrities and
public figures participated in the New York events, thereby boosting perceived newsworthiness.
Thus, a rise takes place in the short term but not in the long term.
— insert Figure 1 here —
The numbers of visual elements and of front-page placements follow a similar curve,
dropping off within the year after Seattle and jumping back to high levels—42 photos and
graphics, nine appearances on front pages— nearly two years later, when a protest occurred
locally. One note of interest in this trend is that starting with Prague the visuals remain relatively
more prominent than text; the number of photographs exceeds the number of stories in six of the
nine time periods. For example, in the case of the “slow” time period for coverage surrounding
Quebec City protests, just six stories were published along with 19 photos, tables or other
graphic elements. While the number of photos rose slightly over time, the number of front pages
stayed constant. The percentage of stories in each period that ran on a section front page ranged
from 17 percent to 33 percent, and the proportion remained the same for New York as it had
been for Seattle (26 percent).
Even with the inclusion of New York, which presents a special geographic circumstance,
the prominence of coverage of the anti-globalization movement does not increase substantially
over the course of three years, when measured by a combination of quantity of stories, visual
salience and placement. Hypothesis 1 must be rejected. It seems clear, however, that the 1999
demonstrations against the World Trade Organization put the anti-globalization movement on
the journalists’ map, so to speak. Only one story was identified addressing this topic in the Times
in the four months prior to Seattle, yet 191 stories—ranging from six to 42 per time period—
were published in the 29 months following that watershed event.


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 15 of 30   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.