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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 16 16 Seattle and Washington, D.C., were described with the most negative terms (10.8 per story) while the behaviors, appearances and attitudes of movement members during Doha and New York were portrayed in this coverage with the fewest negative terms (4.4 per story, in both instances). — insert Figure 3 here — The findings for Hypothesis 4 were more ambivalent. This hypothesis stated that the number of positive terms used by the Times to describe the movement’s influence, support and goals would increase during the three years under study. Indeed, the dotted line in Figure 3 does illustrate a rise in positive descriptors in certain time periods (Prague, Quebec City, Genoa, New York) but a decline in other periods (Washington D.C., Davos, Doha). Although there is a net per-story rise of approximately 50 percent from Seattle to New York—from 6.3 positive terms per story to 9.2—the overall direction of change is too jagged to offer substantial support for the hypothesis that the newspaper would depict the movement’s effectiveness more favorably over time. In considering the later time periods, the extremely low average of 2.6 at Doha offsets the extremely high average of 9.2 at New York, a number that might be partially explained by the editorial proximity and celebrity luster of Manhattan. The final hypothesis addressed the proportion of negative terms used to describe anti- globalization protest events (clash, chaos, riot, violence…) as compared to neutral and positive terms (demonstration, march, teach-in, rally...) in the New York Times’ coverage; the researchers predicted that this ratio would decrease substantially from 1999 to 2002. The results offer some support for that expectation. As Figure 4 demonstrates, the percentage of negative terms drops from 50 percent before Seattle to 33 percent in New York. However, many dips and rises occur in-between, so that the change over time shows no clear trend. While the number of negative

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 16
16
Seattle and Washington, D.C., were described with the most negative terms (10.8 per story)
while the behaviors, appearances and attitudes of movement members during Doha and New
York were portrayed in this coverage with the fewest negative terms (4.4 per story, in both
instances).
— insert Figure 3 here —
The findings for Hypothesis 4 were more ambivalent. This hypothesis stated that the
number of positive terms used by the Times to describe the movement’s influence, support and
goals would increase during the three years under study. Indeed, the dotted line in Figure 3 does
illustrate a rise in positive descriptors in certain time periods (Prague, Quebec City, Genoa, New
York) but a decline in other periods (Washington D.C., Davos, Doha). Although there is a net
per-story rise of approximately 50 percent from Seattle to New York—from 6.3 positive terms
per story to 9.2—the overall direction of change is too jagged to offer substantial support for the
hypothesis that the newspaper would depict the movement’s effectiveness more favorably over
time. In considering the later time periods, the extremely low average of 2.6 at Doha offsets the
extremely high average of 9.2 at New York, a number that might be partially explained by the
editorial proximity and celebrity luster of Manhattan.
The final hypothesis addressed the proportion of negative terms used to describe anti-
globalization protest events (clash, chaos, riot, violence…) as compared to neutral and positive
terms (demonstration, march, teach-in, rally...) in the New York Times’ coverage; the researchers
predicted that this ratio would decrease substantially from 1999 to 2002. The results offer some
support for that expectation. As Figure 4 demonstrates, the percentage of negative terms drops
from 50 percent before Seattle to 33 percent in New York. However, many dips and rises occur
in-between, so that the change over time shows no clear trend. While the number of negative


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