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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 1 1 From the “Battle of Seattle” to the “War on Terrorism” in The New York Times: Framing Protests Against Globalization Whether considered a boon to economic and political development or a threat to social and ecological well-being—or a mixture of both—globalization has become not only a fashionable term but a defining phenomenon of the late 20 th and early 21 st centuries. The three years surrounding the turn of the millennium, in particular, witnessed a proliferation of discussions and demonstrations throughout society about the consequences of unfettered trade and the organizations that promote it. Meanwhile, the term anti-globalization has gained widespread usage because it addresses the interconnected concerns of a network of groups as disparate as the Sierra Club, the United Steelworkers of America, the Ruckus Society, and Mobilization for Global Justice. Demonstrations against the perceived political, economic, cultural, ecological and social harm associated with globalization seem to have moved up the U.S. media agenda in recent years. Relegated not long ago to page-23 news (see Ellison, 1999), such public expressions of dissent moved definitively to the front pages in November 1999 when activists and police clashed at a World Trade Organization meeting in the “Battle of Seattle.” This event—which began peacefully with tens of thousands of protestors disrupting a WTO session, escalated as police used force to break up crowds, and ended with rioting, looting, arson and a declaration of civil emergency—was followed by press around the world and emerged as a pivotal moment in the development of a new social movement. The Seattle protest was the beginning of the anti-globalization movement’s thrust into the national spotlight. In the subsequent years, a large and loose network of groups and individuals united to express resistance to globalization at meetings of the World Trade Organization, World

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 1
1
From the “Battle of Seattle” to the “War on Terrorism” in The New York Times:
Framing Protests Against Globalization
Whether considered a boon to economic and political development or a threat to social
and ecological well-being—or a mixture of both—globalization has become not only a
fashionable term but a defining phenomenon of the late 20
th
and early 21
st
centuries. The three
years surrounding the turn of the millennium, in particular, witnessed a proliferation of
discussions and demonstrations throughout society about the consequences of unfettered trade
and the organizations that promote it. Meanwhile, the term anti-globalization has gained
widespread usage because it addresses the interconnected concerns of a network of groups as
disparate as the Sierra Club, the United Steelworkers of America, the Ruckus Society, and
Mobilization for Global Justice.
Demonstrations against the perceived political, economic, cultural, ecological and social
harm associated with globalization seem to have moved up the U.S. media agenda in recent
years. Relegated not long ago to page-23 news (see Ellison, 1999), such public expressions of
dissent moved definitively to the front pages in November 1999 when activists and police
clashed at a World Trade Organization meeting in the “Battle of Seattle.” This event—which
began peacefully with tens of thousands of protestors disrupting a WTO session, escalated as
police used force to break up crowds, and ended with rioting, looting, arson and a declaration of
civil emergency—was followed by press around the world and emerged as a pivotal moment in
the development of a new social movement.
The Seattle protest was the beginning of the anti-globalization movement’s thrust into the
national spotlight. In the subsequent years, a large and loose network of groups and individuals
united to express resistance to globalization at meetings of the World Trade Organization, World


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