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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 19 19 event descriptors went up more than 50 percent and the percentage of negative event descriptors went down by almost half immediately after September 11. Thus, the data show little evidence of a new “terrorist frame” that altered the nature of anti-globalization movement coverage in this publication. Finally, the researchers asked whether the framing of anti-globalization protests in the Times from 1999 to 2002 fit the traditional “protest paradigm,” which says that the media tend to focus on protestor’s appearances and violent or deviant actions (episodic frames) rather than emphasizing the movement’s issues and effectiveness (thematic frames). This study’s three-year descriptor totals for references to negative member “appearances,” negative member “behaviors/attitudes/threats,” positive movement “goals,” and positive movement “support/influence,” along with the event valence proportions, provide a comparison base for such coverage tendencies. In the entire three years, the average number of mentions per story was 6.7 for member behaviors/attitudes/threats, 4.6 for movement goals, 4.1 for movement support/influence, and 1.1 for member appearances. In contrast with the protest paradigm, negative descriptions of protestor appearances were scarce throughout this reporting, references to the movement’s support and influence were relatively prominent, and the issues were represented—although perhaps superficially in the form of “goals” like protecting the environment or ending poverty, rather than in in-depth analysis. As a whole, however, violent and deviant behavior showed by far the highest per-story averages in these 192 stories. Moreover, the ratio of event descriptors shows that negative portrayals—focusing on violence, confrontations with police, and property damage—outnumber positive ones by nearly three to one. Positive terms accounted for only 15 percent of all event-related descriptors coded in this three-year period, while negative and neutral terms accounted for slightly more than 42

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 19
19
event descriptors went up more than 50 percent and the percentage of negative event descriptors
went down by almost half immediately after September 11. Thus, the data show little evidence of
a new “terrorist frame” that altered the nature of anti-globalization movement coverage in this
publication.
Finally, the researchers asked whether the framing of anti-globalization protests in the
Times from 1999 to 2002 fit the traditional “protest paradigm,” which says that the media tend to
focus on protestor’s appearances and violent or deviant actions (episodic frames) rather than
emphasizing the movement’s issues and effectiveness (thematic frames). This study’s three-year
descriptor totals for references to negative member “appearances,” negative member
“behaviors/attitudes/threats,” positive movement “goals,” and positive movement
“support/influence,” along with the event valence proportions, provide a comparison base for
such coverage tendencies. In the entire three years, the average number of mentions per story
was 6.7 for member behaviors/attitudes/threats, 4.6 for movement goals, 4.1 for movement
support/influence, and 1.1 for member appearances. In contrast with the protest paradigm,
negative descriptions of protestor appearances were scarce throughout this reporting, references
to the movement’s support and influence were relatively prominent, and the issues were
represented—although perhaps superficially in the form of “goals” like protecting the
environment or ending poverty, rather than in in-depth analysis. As a whole, however, violent
and deviant behavior showed by far the highest per-story averages in these 192 stories.
Moreover, the ratio of event descriptors shows that negative portrayals—focusing on
violence, confrontations with police, and property damage—outnumber positive ones by nearly
three to one. Positive terms accounted for only 15 percent of all event-related descriptors coded
in this three-year period, while negative and neutral terms accounted for slightly more than 42


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