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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 20 20 percent each. According to this analysis, words portraying anti-globalization events as chaos, fiascoes, riots, violence and the like appear 743 times in this coverage while references to rallies, teach-ins, pacifism, vigils and so on are used 271 times. In general, the protest paradigm seems to hold true for New York Times reporting on the anti-globalization movement from Seattle to New York. Discussion This longitudinal study of an elite newspaper’s framing of a new social movement over three years demonstrates a complex pattern of stability and dynamism, underscoring the value of looking at changes in media frames over a long time period. Just as a study ending just one year after Seattle would have been likely to show short-term trends that didn’t persist, the three years of coverage analyzed here do not yet suffice to predict the direction in which media representations of the movement are developing. However, the elements of framing associated with the protest paradigm appear fairly consistent and persistent—perhaps because, as Stephen Reese noted (2001), constructing cultural frames occurs over long periods of time with input from a large number of social actors. This content analysis suggest that coverage of the anti-globalization movement from May 1999 to April 2002 may have been driven more by news values such as novelty, violence, and local bias than by any ideological, intellectual or professional learning curves among journalists. This seems evident especially in those cases of protest coverage that defy prevailing trends. For example, the spurts in negative event descriptors at Seattle and Genoa reflect the relationship between events and representations. Reporters may be focusing unfairly on violence when it comprises only a small portion of protest activities, but events will not be described as “riots”

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 20
20
percent each. According to this analysis, words portraying anti-globalization events as chaos,
fiascoes, riots, violence and the like appear 743 times in this coverage while references to rallies,
teach-ins, pacifism, vigils and so on are used 271 times. In general, the protest paradigm seems to
hold true for New York Times reporting on the anti-globalization movement from Seattle to New
York.
Discussion
This longitudinal study of an elite newspaper’s framing of a new social movement over
three years demonstrates a complex pattern of stability and dynamism, underscoring the value of
looking at changes in media frames over a long time period. Just as a study ending just one year
after Seattle would have been likely to show short-term trends that didn’t persist, the three years
of coverage analyzed here do not yet suffice to predict the direction in which media
representations of the movement are developing. However, the elements of framing associated
with the protest paradigm appear fairly consistent and persistent—perhaps because, as Stephen
Reese noted (2001), constructing cultural frames occurs over long periods of time with input
from a large number of social actors.
This content analysis suggest that coverage of the anti-globalization movement from May
1999 to April 2002 may have been driven more by news values such as novelty, violence, and
local bias than by any ideological, intellectual or professional learning curves among journalists.
This seems evident especially in those cases of protest coverage that defy prevailing trends. For
example, the spurts in negative event descriptors at Seattle and Genoa reflect the relationship
between events and representations. Reporters may be focusing unfairly on violence when it
comprises only a small portion of protest activities, but events will not be described as “riots”


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