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From the 'Battle of Seattle' to the 'War on Terrorism' in The New York Times
Unformatted Document Text:  From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 8 8 Method This framing study was conducted via a content analysis of three years of anti- globalization protest coverage in the New York Times. This publication was chosen because of its prestige: it is generally considered the U.S. newspaper of record, is widely read and quoted, and can be expected to influence both audiences and other media (Lule, 1989). Furthermore, it was important to select for analysis the reporting produced by a national media organization that is relatively neutral in respect to location of the protest activities being examined. The proximity of events and sources to journalists—and their readers—has a strong influence on coverage (Berkowitz & Beach, 1993), but geographic bias is somewhat less likely to have influenced the quantity or quality of articles in a newspaper with international scope such as the New York Times than in regional publications. The researchers decided to focus on changes in one newspaper’s coverage over time, in order to limit confounding variables. Data were collected for a three-year period beginning four months prior to the Seattle protest coverage and ending four months after the World Trade Center attacks: from May 1, 1999, to April 30, 2002. In order to capture the full range of New York Times’ representations of the anti-globalization movement—as breaking or spot news (episodic) as well as features and analyses (thematic)—the study sought to identify all relevant articles, rather than a sample. A census provides the most valid discussion of the population, whereas probability sampling might have missed key parts of the coverage. The population was determined by searching for all New York Times stories in the Lexis/Nexis database in this time period that matched one or more terms in each of the following three groups of keywords: 1. globaliz* or corporat* or capitalis* or anti-trade or anarchis*

Authors: Rauch, Jennifer., Chitrapu, Sunitha., Evans, John., Mwesige, Peter., Paine, Christopher. and Eastman, Susan.
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From the ‘Battle of Seattle’ to the ‘War on Terrorism’ 8
8
Method
This framing study was conducted via a content analysis of three years of anti-
globalization protest coverage in the New York Times. This publication was chosen because of its
prestige: it is generally considered the U.S. newspaper of record, is widely read and quoted, and
can be expected to influence both audiences and other media (Lule, 1989). Furthermore, it was
important to select for analysis the reporting produced by a national media organization that is
relatively neutral in respect to location of the protest activities being examined. The proximity of
events and sources to journalists—and their readers—has a strong influence on coverage
(Berkowitz & Beach, 1993), but geographic bias is somewhat less likely to have influenced the
quantity or quality of articles in a newspaper with international scope such as the New York
Times than in regional publications. The researchers decided to focus on changes in one
newspaper’s coverage over time, in order to limit confounding variables.
Data were collected for a three-year period beginning four months prior to the Seattle
protest coverage and ending four months after the World Trade Center attacks: from May 1,
1999, to April 30, 2002. In order to capture the full range of New York Times’ representations of
the anti-globalization movement—as breaking or spot news (episodic) as well as features and
analyses (thematic)—the study sought to identify all relevant articles, rather than a sample. A
census provides the most valid discussion of the population, whereas probability sampling might
have missed key parts of the coverage. The population was determined by searching for all New
York Times stories in the Lexis/Nexis database in this time period that matched one or more
terms in each of the following three groups of keywords:
1. globaliz* or corporat* or capitalis* or anti-trade or anarchis*


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