All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Four Basic Communication Strategies, Beyond the Borders of Traditional Public Relations Practice
Unformatted Document Text:  2 53rd Annual Conference of the International Communication Association “Communication in Borderlands” May, 23-27, 2003, San Diego, CA, USA Public Relations Division Four Basic Communication Strategies, Beyond the Borders of Traditional Public Relations Practice 1.Introduction Since 1978, Broom has fathered the debate about roles in public relations practice, being abstractions of the everyday activities of public relations practitioners (Dozier, 1992:329). In the same year, Katz and Kahn (1978) introduced roles as a central concept in organizational theory. A role can be seen as “the expected behavior associated with a social position” (Banton, 1996). Broom’s research (Broom, 1982; Broom & Smith, 1979) was focused on the consultant’s roles enacted for senior management by public relations experts. Broom and Smith (1979) conceptualized four dominant roles: the expert prescriber, the communication facilitator, the problem-solving process facilitator and the communication technician. Research indicated that the first three roles were highly interrelated, being part of a common underlying manager’s role. In addition to conforming that the first three roles were indeed interrelated, Dozier (1984) found two major roles (the manager and the technician) and two minor roles (the media relations specialist and the communication liaison). Dozier (1992:334) finally concluded that “the manager and technician roles emerge empirically time and again in studies of different practitioners”. His manager-technician typology has been tested numerous times (for an overview, see Dozier 1992; Toth et al., 1998; L. Grunig et al., 2001) in various countries, including the Netherlands (Ruler, 2000). This Dutch research project confirmed the veracity of J. Grunig’s lamentation (cited in Dozier, 1992:336) that “in carrying out their duties, those who were both responsible for communication

Authors: Van Ruler, A. A. Betteke.
first   previous   Page 2 of 31   next   last



background image
2
53rd Annual Conference of the International Communication Association
“Communication in Borderlands”
May, 23-27, 2003, San Diego, CA, USA
Public Relations Division
Four Basic Communication Strategies,
Beyond the Borders of Traditional Public Relations Practice
1.Introduction
Since 1978, Broom has fathered the debate about roles in public relations practice, being abstractions
of the everyday activities of public relations practitioners (Dozier, 1992:329). In the same year, Katz
and Kahn (1978) introduced roles as a central concept in organizational theory. A role can be seen as
“the expected behavior associated with a social position” (Banton, 1996). Broom’s research (Broom,
1982; Broom & Smith, 1979) was focused on the consultant’s roles enacted for senior management by
public relations experts. Broom and Smith (1979) conceptualized four dominant roles: the expert
prescriber, the communication facilitator, the problem-solving process facilitator and the
communication technician. Research indicated that the first three roles were highly interrelated, being
part of a common underlying manager’s role. In addition to conforming that the first three roles were
indeed interrelated, Dozier (1984) found two major roles (the manager and the technician) and two
minor roles (the media relations specialist and the communication liaison). Dozier (1992:334) finally
concluded that “the manager and technician roles emerge empirically time and again in studies of
different practitioners”.
His manager-technician typology has been tested numerous times (for an overview, see Dozier 1992;
Toth et al., 1998; L. Grunig et al., 2001) in various countries, including the Netherlands (Ruler, 2000).
This Dutch research project confirmed the veracity of J. Grunig’s lamentation (cited in Dozier,
1992:336) that “in carrying out their duties, those who were both responsible for communication


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 2 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.