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Four Basic Communication Strategies, Beyond the Borders of Traditional Public Relations Practice
Unformatted Document Text:  25 The strategy demands a well-rounded policy (since there has to be a clear message), an informative message, and an aware, information seeking public (Renckstorf, 1994). The square bounded by monitored one-way traffic and the connotative side of meaning provides the persuasion strategy. This is the basis of advertising and propaganda. What also fits this square is corporate communication, in the sense of profiling the organization so as to generate a favorable basis for further relationships with relevant stakeholders (cf. Riel, 1995). It is a targeted tuning of the knowledge, attitude, and behaviors of specified others. The strategy demands a well-rounded policy, a persuasive message, and a latent public (Perloff, 1993). The square bounded by two-way traffic and the denotative side of meaning provides the consensus- building strategy. This strategy deals with co-ordination between the organization and the environment or between employees (Dozier, 1992). This strategy is deployed when there are conflicting interests at stake among interdependent parties, and it covers a process of mutual agreement. It advocates an active public, clear negotiations, and room in the policy development process of the organization (J. Grunig, 1992a). The square bounded by two-way traffic and the connotative side of meaning provides the dialogue strategy. This ties in with the fact that many organizations are currently seeking consultation with prioritizing stakeholders, with regard to developing their policies (Woerkum, 1997). It is a facilitating strategy that is specified in so-called interactive policy-making and socially responsible enterprising. This strategy can also be used for the effective handling of job discussions, for small-scale brainstorming to identify particular problems and for the collection of possible solutions (Senge, 1990). The strategy is in keeping with the first phase of policy development (exploration and identification of the problem). It requires informational messages from both sides, and an aware public.

Authors: Van Ruler, A. A. Betteke.
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25
The strategy demands a well-rounded policy (since there has to be a clear message), an informative
message, and an aware, information seeking public (Renckstorf, 1994).
The square bounded by monitored one-way traffic and the connotative side of meaning provides the
persuasion strategy. This is the basis of advertising and propaganda. What also fits this square is
corporate communication, in the sense of profiling the organization so as to generate a favorable basis
for further relationships with relevant stakeholders (cf. Riel, 1995). It is a targeted tuning of the
knowledge, attitude, and behaviors of specified others. The strategy demands a well-rounded policy, a
persuasive message, and a latent public (Perloff, 1993).
The square bounded by two-way traffic and the denotative side of meaning provides the consensus-
building strategy. This strategy deals with co-ordination between the organization and the environment
or between employees (Dozier, 1992). This strategy is deployed when there are conflicting interests at
stake among interdependent parties, and it covers a process of mutual agreement. It advocates an
active public, clear negotiations, and room in the policy development process of the organization (J.
Grunig, 1992a).
The square bounded by two-way traffic and the connotative side of meaning provides the dialogue
strategy. This ties in with the fact that many organizations are currently seeking consultation with
prioritizing stakeholders, with regard to developing their policies (Woerkum, 1997). It is a facilitating
strategy that is specified in so-called interactive policy-making and socially responsible enterprising.
This strategy can also be used for the effective handling of job discussions, for small-scale
brainstorming to identify particular problems and for the collection of possible solutions (Senge,
1990). The strategy is in keeping with the first phase of policy development (exploration and
identification of the problem). It requires informational messages from both sides, and an aware
public.


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