All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Four Basic Communication Strategies, Beyond the Borders of Traditional Public Relations Practice
Unformatted Document Text:  5 is a theoretical construction in which certain aspects are highlighted on theoretical grounds, while others are neglected. These two types are often combined, for example in the case of Hofstede’s (1980) typology research into national cultures and the above-mentioned dichotomy of Dozier. Weber is the founding father of typology (Eliaison, 2002). His “ideal type” can be seen as a lasting contribution to sociology. “An ideal type is formed by the one-sided accentuation of one or more points of view and by the synthesis of a great many diffuse, discrete, more or less present and occasionally absent concrete individual phenomena, which are arranged according to those one- sidedly emphasized viewpoints into a unified analytical construct” (Weber, 1949:90, cited in Ritzer, 2000:223). A typology creates a mental construct, made for the purpose of knowledge formation, by means of comparison with reality (Eliaeson, 2002:38). Weber himself wrote that the ideal type “serves as a harbor until one has learned to navigate safely in the vast sea of empirical facts” (Weber, 1949:104, cited in Eliaeson, 2002:49). Ideal types are not the product of the social scientist’s whim or fancy, they are logically constructed concepts which must pass the test of empirical adequacy. Rather than a simple exercise in intuition, they are actually based on rational interpretation (Eliaeson, 2002:42). Ideal types are not intended to be “one best form”, they serve to highlight the relativity of cultural meanings (Alvesson & Sköldberg, 2000). The word “ideal” refers to the fact that a typology, as such, cannot be found in reality. A typology is not meant to reflect reality on a one-to-one basis. However, a typology has no value if it cannot be used to make sense of the real world. That is why the first part of the research question posed in this paper is how can we construct a typology of communication models-in-use, based on differentiations in communication theory. The second part is can we trace these models in the professional public relations literature, and if so, which models are present and which are not, what public relations approach does they reveal. The third part is what can we say about these approaches from a communication theory perspective. In the next section, differences in communication theory are highlighted in order to provide a valuable system for classifying possible communication models-in-use.

Authors: Van Ruler, A. A. Betteke.
first   previous   Page 5 of 31   next   last



background image
5
is a theoretical construction in which certain aspects are highlighted on theoretical grounds, while
others are neglected. These two types are often combined, for example in the case of Hofstede’s
(1980) typology research into national cultures and the above-mentioned dichotomy of Dozier.
Weber is the founding father of typology (Eliaison, 2002). His “ideal type” can be seen as a lasting
contribution to sociology. “An ideal type is formed by the one-sided accentuation of one or more
points of view and by the synthesis of a great many diffuse, discrete, more or less present and
occasionally absent concrete individual phenomena, which are arranged according to those one-
sidedly emphasized viewpoints into a unified analytical construct” (Weber, 1949:90, cited in Ritzer,
2000:223). A typology creates a mental construct, made for the purpose of knowledge formation, by
means of comparison with reality (Eliaeson, 2002:38). Weber himself wrote that the ideal type “serves
as a harbor until one has learned to navigate safely in the vast sea of empirical facts” (Weber,
1949:104, cited in Eliaeson, 2002:49).
Ideal types are not the product of the social scientist’s whim or fancy, they are logically constructed
concepts which must pass the test of empirical adequacy. Rather than a simple exercise in intuition,
they are actually based on rational interpretation (Eliaeson, 2002:42). Ideal types are not intended to be
“one best form”, they serve to highlight the relativity of cultural meanings (Alvesson & Sköldberg,
2000). The word “ideal” refers to the fact that a typology, as such, cannot be found in reality. A
typology is not meant to reflect reality on a one-to-one basis. However, a typology has no value if it
cannot be used to make sense of the real world.
That is why the first part of the research question posed in this paper is how can we construct a
typology of communication models-in-use, based on differentiations in communication theory. The
second part is can we trace these models in the professional public relations literature, and if so,
which models are present and which are not, what public relations approach does they reveal. The
third part is what can we say about these approaches from a communication theory perspective.
In the next section, differences in communication theory are highlighted in order to provide a valuable
system for classifying possible communication models-in-use.


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.