All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Balance in Campaign Coverage
Unformatted Document Text:  Coverage Balance 17 do anything to win”; “the mainstream press corps disliked Gore’s canned and controlled nature”; “Gore’s pedagogical style didn’t work as well with journalists as Bush’s easy backslapping”; “The media tended to be more sympathetic to Bush because of Gore’s inability to break out of that wooden mold”; “Bush by and large did get good press for a long time.” However, the castings of candidates’ personalities in the mediated messages were, to some extent, more affected by such campaign strategies as a candidate’s relations with the press corps and the image making of his candidacy than the real personas. Some reporters supported this argument, comparing media attitudes before and after Election Day: “Bush’s hospitality continued until the last week or so, when he became less accessible and less responsive to questions. For Gore, it was the reverse. During the Florida recount, Gore was portrayed as friendlier.” Other interviewees indicated the success of Bush’s image making: “Bush masked his deeply conservative views with his talk of being a passionate conservative and withheld from the public news of his indiscretions such as his drunken driving conviction.” The nature of the different expectations toward both candidates also resulted in dissimilar castings of personalities or characters: “Bush’s advance mocking character indicated that he was not so smart. We were shocked to discover that. However, a low expectation for Bush and his cooperative personality made him get lots of ‘the guy isn’t so stupid, after all’ coverage”; “The view that Bush was not smart enough for the job permeated the coverage and reporters’ attitudes. However, it was better for Bush, compared with Gore.” One reporter saw as plausible a negative relationship between reporters’ familiarity with the candidates and favorable coverage: “Bush, at the beginning, was the more unknown quantity. Since most of the political press comes from Washington, reporters were very familiar with Gore. And you know what they say: Familiarity breeds contempt. That is an attitude born at the reporting level.”

Authors: Son, Young Jun. and Weaver, David.
first   previous   Page 17 of 29   next   last



background image
Coverage Balance 17
do anything to win”; “the mainstream press corps disliked Gore’s canned and controlled nature”;
“Gore’s pedagogical style didn’t work as well with journalists as Bush’s easy backslapping”;
“The media tended to be more sympathetic to Bush because of Gore’s inability to break out of
that wooden mold”; “Bush by and large did get good press for a long time.”
However, the castings of candidates’ personalities in the mediated messages were, to
some extent, more affected by such campaign strategies as a candidate’s relations with the press
corps and the image making of his candidacy than the real personas. Some reporters supported
this argument, comparing media attitudes before and after Election Day: “Bush’s hospitality
continued until the last week or so, when he became less accessible and less responsive to
questions. For Gore, it was the reverse. During the Florida recount, Gore was portrayed as
friendlier.” Other interviewees indicated the success of Bush’s image making: “Bush masked his
deeply conservative views with his talk of being a passionate conservative and withheld from the
public news of his indiscretions such as his drunken driving conviction.”
The nature of the different expectations toward both candidates also resulted in dissimilar
castings of personalities or characters: “Bush’s advance mocking character indicated that he was
not so smart. We were shocked to discover that. However, a low expectation for Bush and his
cooperative personality made him get lots of ‘the guy isn’t so stupid, after all’ coverage”; “The
view that Bush was not smart enough for the job permeated the coverage and reporters’ attitudes.
However, it was better for Bush, compared with Gore.” One reporter saw as plausible a negative
relationship between reporters’ familiarity with the candidates and favorable coverage: “Bush, at
the beginning, was the more unknown quantity. Since most of the political press comes from
Washington, reporters were very familiar with Gore. And you know what they say: Familiarity
breeds contempt. That is an attitude born at the reporting level.”


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.