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Analysis on Hostage Crisis Negotiations With Regard to Identity Concerns
Unformatted Document Text:  Hostage Negotiations 5 condition in which a relationship favorable to the law enforcement side may develop. Olin and Born (1983) emphasize that it is important for law enforcement personnel "to demonstrate immediate and absolute control of the outer perimeter" so that they can maximally limit the hostage taker’s conduct (p. 22). Fuselier (1986) warns that if the perpetrator establishes contact with media, with friends, or with relatives, the situation may become worse (p. 13). A negotiator should use communication techniques strategically in order to establish a favorable relationship with the perpetrator. For example, modification of verbal behavior such as vernacular and phraseological adjustment comes first (Fuselier, 1981, p. 12). According to Fuselier (1981), a negotiator should also "identify him or herself by first name and address the hostage taker in the manner the perpetrator desires" to demonstrate a good faith and respect (p. 12). This can lead to the establishment of a relationship that is characterized by collaboration toward a goal on the part of both the negotiator and the perpetrator. Olin and Born (1983) also discuss the significance of developing a direct and immediate relationship between the negotiator and the perpetrator. According to Olin and Born, caring behavior and reward will help this relational development. When the perpetrator shows positive behavior, such behavior "should be responded to with warmth, understanding, and encouragement" (p. 23). This positive reinforcement should encourage the perpetrator’s willingness to continue talking (p. 23). Rational discussion is the most desired element for resolution of a hostage-taking incident. Rogan and Hammer (1994) argue that the perpetrator's emotional excitation level must be reduced so that the perpetrator can stabilize his or her sense of self (p. 217).

Authors: Ie, Fumiko.
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Hostage Negotiations 5
condition in which a relationship favorable to the law enforcement side may develop.
Olin and Born (1983) emphasize that it is important for law enforcement personnel "to
demonstrate immediate and absolute control of the outer perimeter" so that they can
maximally limit the hostage taker’s conduct (p. 22). Fuselier (1986) warns that if the
perpetrator establishes contact with media, with friends, or with relatives, the situation
may become worse (p. 13).
A negotiator should use communication techniques strategically in order to
establish a favorable relationship with the perpetrator. For example, modification of
verbal behavior such as vernacular and phraseological adjustment comes first (Fuselier,
1981, p. 12). According to Fuselier (1981), a negotiator should also "identify him or
herself by first name and address the hostage taker in the manner the perpetrator desires"
to demonstrate a good faith and respect (p. 12). This can lead to the establishment of a
relationship that is characterized by collaboration toward a goal on the part of both the
negotiator and the perpetrator. Olin and Born (1983) also discuss the significance of
developing a direct and immediate relationship between the negotiator and the
perpetrator. According to Olin and Born, caring behavior and reward will help this
relational development. When the perpetrator shows positive behavior, such behavior
"should be responded to with warmth, understanding, and encouragement" (p. 23). This
positive reinforcement should encourage the perpetrator’s willingness to continue talking
(p. 23).
Rational discussion is the most desired element for resolution of a hostage-taking
incident. Rogan and Hammer (1994) argue that the perpetrator's emotional excitation
level must be reduced so that the perpetrator can stabilize his or her sense of self (p. 217).


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