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Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender

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Abstract:

The effect of exposure to thin and plus-size fashion models was examined in two studies. Perceptions of the ideal female body shape moved toward a heavier ideal after exposure to plus-size models in comparison to exposure to thin models. This effect was significant for both men and women. In a follow-up experiment, an elastic body image effect was found in the plus-models condition, but not the thin-models condition. Women who saw plus-size models rated their actual body shapes to be slightly heavier than their pre-exposure estimations. However, no significant shifts were observed among women who saw thin models. Various social judgment biases were identified. Most notably, women tend to overestimate menís preference for thinness. Men, on the other hand, present conflicting data. Compared to women, men preferred a heavier female ideal. On the other hand, men also found thin models to be more attractive than plus-size models. These findings are examined within the context of social comparisons and social judgment biases.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

bodi (241), ideal (215), model (194), thin (140), imag (130), women (116), men (96), social (93), plus (90), self (78), effect (76), size (73), signific (64), plus-siz (63), shape (63), norm (60), comparison (58), m (53), 1 (51), rate (51), studi (48),

Author's Keywords:

media, body image, social judgment, social comparison, gender
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Name: International Communication Association
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MLA Citation:

Prabu, David., Liu, Kaiya. and Cortese, Juliann. "Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112055_index.html>

APA Citation:

Prabu, D. , Liu, K. and Cortese, J. , 2003-05-27 "Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p112055_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The effect of exposure to thin and plus-size fashion models was examined in two studies. Perceptions of the ideal female body shape moved toward a heavier ideal after exposure to plus-size models in comparison to exposure to thin models. This effect was significant for both men and women. In a follow-up experiment, an elastic body image effect was found in the plus-models condition, but not the thin-models condition. Women who saw plus-size models rated their actual body shapes to be slightly heavier than their pre-exposure estimations. However, no significant shifts were observed among women who saw thin models. Various social judgment biases were identified. Most notably, women tend to overestimate menís preference for thinness. Men, on the other hand, present conflicting data. Compared to women, men preferred a heavier female ideal. On the other hand, men also found thin models to be more attractive than plus-size models. These findings are examined within the context of social comparisons and social judgment biases.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 40
Word count: 9885
Text sample:
Ideal Body Image 1 Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender Prabu David Juliann Cortese Kaiya Liu Ohio State University Paper submitted to Mass Communication Division ICA 2003 Correspondence to: pdavid@osu.edu Prabu David 3016 Derby Hall 154 North Oval Mall Columbus OH 43210 Ideal Body Image 2 Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender The effect of exposure to thin and plus-size fashion models was
61(6) 946-956. Stunkard A. J. Sorensen T. & Schulsinger F. (1983). Use of the Danish adoption register for the study of obesity and thinness. In S. Kety L. P. Rowland R. L. Sidman & S. W. Matthysse (Eds.) The genetics of neurological and psychiatric disorders (pp. 115-120). New York NY: Raven. Thompson J. K. & Altabe M. N. (1991). Psychometric qualities of the figure rating scale. International Journal of Eating Disorders 10(5) 615-619. Ideal Body Image 40 Thompson J.


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