All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Explaining Information Effects in Collective Preferences
Unformatted Document Text:  INSERT TABLE 4 HERE While political knowledge is not the same as salience, the two constructs are positively related to one another. All of the salience measures are positively correlated with each other as well as with political knowledge, and a factor analysis suggests that they represent different facets of a single underlying construct. 20 Nonetheless, while the general trend between knowledge and salience is unmistakable, it is also important to note that none of these correlations is especially large. Political knowledge and issue salience are related but only modestly so, which means that salience can moderate the size of information effects independently from levels of political knowledge. The last two rows of table 4 show that the opinions of people with higher levels of salience have smaller average information effects. 21 This relationship holds even after controlling for levels of political knowledge by testing for salience effects among the least knowledgeable quartile, although the impact of salience for this group is much more limited than it is among all respondents taken together. The same tendency can be observed in questions about topics that should be more salient to some kinds of respondents than others. A good example of this comes in differences between respondents from union and non-union families for a question asking whether foreign imports should be limited in order to protect American jobs. 22 Individual-level information effects were significantly smaller among respondents from union households in each of the three years this question was 20 Principal components analysis of the seven salience measures returns two factors, which oblimin rotation shows to be only slightly correlated (r=.19). The first factor consists of significant positive loadings for average issue salience, interest in public affairs, and the three measures of campaign interest, while the second has positive loadings for the number of important national problems and differences between parties mentioned by respondents. This second factor may well represent nothing more than propensity toward talkativeness, since these two salience measures are counts of problems and differences volunteered by respondents under prompting from the survey interviewer. A two-factor solution is still returned when political knowledge is entered along with the salience measures. In this expanded model, however, political knowledge has positive and similarly large loads on both factors. 21 The measure of individual-level information effects used in this table is each respondent’s average percentage point gap between surveyed and simulated opinion across all questions answered. 22 The exact wording of this question is “Some people have suggested placing new limits on foreign imports in order to protect American jobs. Others say that such limits would raise consumer prices and hurt American exports. Do you favor or oppose placing new limits on imports, or haven’t you thought much about this?”

Authors: Althaus, Scott.
first   previous   Page 22 of 53   next   last



background image
INSERT TABLE 4 HERE
While political knowledge is not the same as salience, the two constructs are positively related
to one another. All of the salience measures are positively correlated with each other as well as with
political knowledge, and a factor analysis suggests that they represent different facets of a single
underlying construct.
20
Nonetheless, while the general trend between knowledge and salience is
unmistakable, it is also important to note that none of these correlations is especially large. Political
knowledge and issue salience are related but only modestly so, which means that salience can
moderate the size of information effects independently from levels of political knowledge. The last
two rows of table 4 show that the opinions of people with higher levels of salience have smaller
average information effects.
21
This relationship holds even after controlling for levels of political
knowledge by testing for salience effects among the least knowledgeable quartile, although the
impact of salience for this group is much more limited than it is among all respondents taken
together.
The same tendency can be observed in questions about topics that should be more salient to
some kinds of respondents than others. A good example of this comes in differences between
respondents from union and non-union families for a question asking whether foreign imports should
be limited in order to protect American jobs.
22
Individual-level information effects were significantly
smaller among respondents from union households in each of the three years this question was
20 Principal components analysis of the seven salience measures returns two factors, which oblimin rotation
shows to be only slightly correlated (r=.19). The first factor consists of significant positive loadings for average
issue salience, interest in public affairs, and the three measures of campaign interest, while the second has positive
loadings for the number of important national problems and differences between parties mentioned by respondents.
This second factor may well represent nothing more than propensity toward talkativeness, since these two salience
measures are counts of problems and differences volunteered by respondents under prompting from the survey
interviewer. A two-factor solution is still returned when political knowledge is entered along with the salience
measures. In this expanded model, however, political knowledge has positive and similarly large loads on both
factors.
21 The measure of individual-level information effects used in this table is each respondent’s average
percentage point gap between surveyed and simulated opinion across all questions answered.
22 The exact wording of this question is “Some people have suggested placing new limits on foreign imports in
order to protect American jobs. Others say that such limits would raise consumer prices and hurt American exports.
Do you favor or oppose placing new limits on imports, or haven’t you thought much about this?”


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 22 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.