All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Explaining Information Effects in Collective Preferences
Unformatted Document Text:  asked, despite the fact that union respondents are slightly less knowledgeable on average compared to non-union respondents. 23 At the group level, however, a somewhat different picture emerged. Union respondents had a two-point gap between their surveyed and “fully informed” collective opinion in 1988, a gap of nine points in 1992, and a gap of six points in 1996. Among non-union respondents, the difference between surveyed and simulated collective opinions was 11 points in 1988, six points in 1992, and five points in 1996. Even though the individual-level information effects were smaller for union respondents in each of these years, the direction of these effects tended to be fairly random in 1988 but more systematic in 1992 and 1996. At the collective level, union opinion in the latter years had larger collective-level information effects than non-union opinion while at the same time having smaller individual-level effects. The underlying reason for this change is unclear, although it could arise from changing attitude structures, rising levels of domain- specific knowledge, changes in the salience of this issue, or shifts in cultural or historical dimensions of the foreign imports issue. To get a better purchase on such possibilities, it becomes important to consider how political issues are constructed, discussed, and connected to one another in the flows of information reaching citizens through mass media and interpersonal networks. <A> Environmental Influences on Attitude Structures, Policy-Specific Knowledge, and Issue Salience Information effects can arise when well- and ill-informed citizens possess different attitude structures, amounts of policy-specific knowledge, or levels of issue salience. But what can explain these divergences? Less knowledgeable citizens were shown to think about welfare programs quite unlike the way their more knowledgeable citizens did, to be less aware of an important development in the country’s fiscal health, and to be less concerned about specific issues and public affairs in general. The most likely source of these differences is the information environments in which people come to form their policy preferences. 23 Among the group of respondents from union families, who stood to be directly affected by limits on foreign imports, the average individual-level information effect was 12 points in 1988, 12 points in 1992, and seven points in 1996. Among non-union respondents, the average individual-level gap between surveyed and simulated opinions was 18 percentage points in 1988, 14 points in 1992, and 14 in 1996. These differences were all significant, t(1108)=4.84, p<.001 for 1988, t(1395)=2.00, p<.05 for 1992, and t(774)=6.49, p<.001 for 1996.

Authors: Althaus, Scott.
first   previous   Page 23 of 53   next   last



background image
asked, despite the fact that union respondents are slightly less knowledgeable on average compared
to non-union respondents.
23
At the group level, however, a somewhat different picture emerged.
Union respondents had a two-point gap between their surveyed and “fully informed” collective
opinion in 1988, a gap of nine points in 1992, and a gap of six points in 1996. Among non-union
respondents, the difference between surveyed and simulated collective opinions was 11 points in
1988, six points in 1992, and five points in 1996. Even though the individual-level information
effects were smaller for union respondents in each of these years, the direction of these effects
tended to be fairly random in 1988 but more systematic in 1992 and 1996. At the collective level,
union opinion in the latter years had larger collective-level information effects than non-union
opinion while at the same time having smaller individual-level effects. The underlying reason for this
change is unclear, although it could arise from changing attitude structures, rising levels of domain-
specific knowledge, changes in the salience of this issue, or shifts in cultural or historical dimensions
of the foreign imports issue. To get a better purchase on such possibilities, it becomes important to
consider how political issues are constructed, discussed, and connected to one another in the flows of
information reaching citizens through mass media and interpersonal networks.
<A>
Environmental Influences on Attitude Structures, Policy-Specific Knowledge, and Issue Salience
Information effects can arise when well- and ill-informed citizens possess different attitude
structures, amounts of policy-specific knowledge, or levels of issue salience. But what can explain
these divergences? Less knowledgeable citizens were shown to think about welfare programs quite
unlike the way their more knowledgeable citizens did, to be less aware of an important development
in the country’s fiscal health, and to be less concerned about specific issues and public affairs in
general. The most likely source of these differences is the information environments in which people
come to form their policy preferences.
23 Among the group of respondents from union families, who stood to be directly affected by limits on foreign
imports, the average individual-level information effect was 12 points in 1988, 12 points in 1992, and seven points in
1996. Among non-union respondents, the average individual-level gap between surveyed and simulated opinions was
18 percentage points in 1988, 14 points in 1992, and 14 in 1996. These differences were all significant,
t(1108)=4.84, p<.001 for 1988, t(1395)=2.00, p<.05 for 1992, and t(774)=6.49, p<.001 for 1996.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 53   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.