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Effect of Thin vs. Plus-Size Models: A Comparison of Body Image Ideals by Gender
Unformatted Document Text:  Ideal Body Image, 22 week before the study, and (2) assessment of actual body shape after the study. With these changes, our goal was to replicate Experiment 1 and examine the body image elasticity hypothesis stated in H6. Design and Participants Participants were 240 (125 females and 115 males) undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory communication course who participated in the study for extra credit. The characteristics of the students closely matched the profile from Experiment 1. Students ranged in age from 17 to 54 (M = 21, SD = 3.8). Approximately 85% of the students were Caucasian. The mean BMI for the sample was 24 (SD = 4.1). As in Experiment 1, the only experimental manipulation was the random assignment of participants to the thin or plus-size conditions. Stimuli and Measures All stimuli and measures were identical to Experimental 1. Procedure A week before the experiment, students were recruited to participate in an online study about media. At this time, respondents were asked to provide evaluations of actual body shape, ideal body shape (for men, this question was phrased as “preference for ideal body shape in a woman”), and assessments of what other women and other men would consider as ideal. Students marked their assessments on the Stunkard, Sorensen, and Schlsinger (1983) scale administered as a paper and pencil measure. Seven days the baseline assessment, the study website was made available and participants logged onto this website to complete the study. The procedure was identical to Experiment 1. After filling out self-esteem and physique anxiety scales, students were

Authors: Prabu, David., Liu, Kaiya. and Cortese, Juliann.
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Ideal Body Image, 22
week before the study, and (2) assessment of actual body shape after the study. With
these changes, our goal was to replicate Experiment 1 and examine the body image
elasticity hypothesis stated in H6.
Design and Participants
Participants were 240 (125 females and 115 males) undergraduate students
enrolled in an introductory communication course who participated in the study for extra
credit. The characteristics of the students closely matched the profile from Experiment 1.
Students ranged in age from 17 to 54 (M = 21, SD = 3.8). Approximately 85% of the
students were Caucasian. The mean BMI for the sample was 24 (SD = 4.1). As in
Experiment 1, the only experimental manipulation was the random assignment of
participants to the thin or plus-size conditions.
Stimuli and Measures
All stimuli and measures were identical to Experimental 1.
Procedure
A week before the experiment, students were recruited to participate in an online
study about media. At this time, respondents were asked to provide evaluations of actual
body shape, ideal body shape (for men, this question was phrased as “preference for ideal
body shape in a woman”), and assessments of what other women and other men would
consider as ideal. Students marked their assessments on the Stunkard, Sorensen, and
Schlsinger (1983) scale administered as a paper and pencil measure.
Seven days the baseline assessment, the study website was made available and
participants logged onto this website to complete the study. The procedure was identical
to Experiment 1. After filling out self-esteem and physique anxiety scales, students were


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