All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers: Journalists Discuss Diversity Programs
Unformatted Document Text:  Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers 11 One of the most critical factors affecting the practice of diversity at the newspapers was the relationship (past and present) that journalists felt they had with their communities. In several cases, reporters and editors described an ongoing struggle to change their newspapers’ reputations as racist and sensationalist in covering minority communities. Viewing the newspaper as part of the problem was something the newspapers had explicitly tried to change in incorporating practices in reporting. In the city served by the Hearst paper the Hispanic community was in the majority. According to the Assistant Managing Editor (a Hispanic man), Charles, the newspaper in the past had stereotyped the Hispanic community in its coverage, resulting in residual feelings of resentment. Although the goal for this paper as well as others was ‘image-rebuilding,’ it was a difficult process and sometimes hard to achieve because, as Charles said, “negative stories take people back to a negative impression of the newspaper.” Similarly, employees at the Tribune paper cited the paper’s history as a major obstacle to its diversity efforts. According to several reporters, the current staff had to overcome the old racist policies of the newspaper. In the eyes of minority communities, even formal policies and efforts to diversify were not trusted, particularly when language, stereotypes, negative images had all too frequently made it into the newspaper in the past. The editor (a white man) of The Tribune paper, Darryl expressed this sense of frustration in dealing with the community in terms of their old ideas about the newspaper. Darryl acknowledged and admitted that the paper (before The Tribune Company owned it) had been racist in its policies, particularly toward the African American community, but he felt they were not now. However, Darryl sometimes felt the community still believed that the newspaper wanted to discriminate against them and any negative story about the community was seen as a direct ‘offense’ against the community. Because of the problems with past coverage of communities by the newspapers, establishing new relationships with community sources and leaders became critical to the reporters and editors. Management at the newspapers expressed that one of the most

Authors: Johnston, Anne. and Flamiano, Dolores.
first   previous   Page 11 of 33   next   last



background image
Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers
11
One of the most critical factors affecting the practice of diversity at the
newspapers was the relationship (past and present) that journalists felt they had with their
communities. In several cases, reporters and editors described an ongoing struggle to
change their newspapers’ reputations as racist and sensationalist in covering minority
communities.
Viewing the newspaper as part of the problem was something the newspapers had
explicitly tried to change in incorporating practices in reporting. In the city served by the
Hearst paper the Hispanic community was in the majority. According to the Assistant
Managing Editor (a Hispanic man), Charles, the newspaper in the past had stereotyped
the Hispanic community in its coverage, resulting in residual feelings of resentment.
Although the goal for this paper as well as others was ‘image-rebuilding,’ it was a
difficult process and sometimes hard to achieve because, as Charles said, “negative
stories take people back to a negative impression of the newspaper.”
Similarly, employees at the Tribune paper cited the paper’s history as a major
obstacle to its diversity efforts. According to several reporters, the current staff had to
overcome the old racist policies of the newspaper. In the eyes of minority communities,
even formal policies and efforts to diversify were not trusted, particularly when language,
stereotypes, negative images had all too frequently made it into the newspaper in the past.
The editor (a white man) of The Tribune paper, Darryl expressed this sense of frustration
in dealing with the community in terms of their old ideas about the newspaper. Darryl
acknowledged and admitted that the paper (before The Tribune Company owned it) had
been racist in its policies, particularly toward the African American community, but he
felt they were not now. However, Darryl sometimes felt the community still believed that
the newspaper wanted to discriminate against them and any negative story about the
community was seen as a direct ‘offense’ against the community.
Because of the problems with past coverage of communities by the newspapers,
establishing new relationships with community sources and leaders became critical to the
reporters and editors. Management at the newspapers expressed that one of the most


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.