All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers: Journalists Discuss Diversity Programs
Unformatted Document Text:  Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers 18 that minorities might leave the paper, but he said that was partly due to the lack of opportunities to advance, because “no one moves out of positions; there’s been no reorganization to open up positions. Everyone gets locked in. If minority reporters and editors don’t perceive a way to move up, then they move out.” James also felt strongly that his paper was not aggressive enough in hiring minorities. “It’s the same response you always hear, ‘there just aren’t enough qualified minorities’,” even though he said he frequently submitted names of qualified minorities. All of the reporters and editors were concerned and talked about advancement, tokenism, promotion and retention of minorities within the newspapers, and some questioned whether the newspapers had done enough to nurture and help young minority reporters. All of the minority reporters stressed the importance of mentoring young reporters, particularly young minority reporters, in order to help them succeed. Although the editors and managing editors said mentoring did happen, some said that they wanted to do more to formalize the process. Margaret also expressed frustration that the bar had been raised for minority reporters during the hiring process. She felt that in many cases, chances were not taken on minority reporters. “But somebody had to take a chance on a white reporter, so why not on a minority reporter?” Another essential factor in practicing diversity was the diversity training and discussions that went on in the newsrooms. All of the newspapers had diversity committees and some had sent reporters to formal diversity training programs. However, some of the reporters expressed dissatisfaction with how the diversity training and conversations were implemented and frustration with the lack of support by management about the training. One important aspect of diversity training at the Knight-Ridder paper, for Louise (white editor) was to try to show that leaders made decisions based on experiences and therefore all voices needed to be heard. To her, it was important to recognize and for staff to recognize that “life experiences will influence what you bring to the table and how you see things.” Some of the reporters felt they were ‘forced’ to go to training sessions and,

Authors: Johnston, Anne. and Flamiano, Dolores.
first   previous   Page 18 of 33   next   last



background image
Bridging the Border between Communities of Color and Mainstream Newspapers
18
that minorities might leave the paper, but he said that was partly due to the lack of
opportunities to advance, because “no one moves out of positions; there’s been no
reorganization to open up positions. Everyone gets locked in. If minority reporters and
editors don’t perceive a way to move up, then they move out.” James also felt strongly
that his paper was not aggressive enough in hiring minorities. “It’s the same response
you always hear, ‘there just aren’t enough qualified minorities’,” even though he said he
frequently submitted names of qualified minorities.
All of the reporters and editors were concerned and talked about advancement,
tokenism, promotion and retention of minorities within the newspapers, and some
questioned whether the newspapers had done enough to nurture and help young minority
reporters. All of the minority reporters stressed the importance of mentoring young
reporters, particularly young minority reporters, in order to help them succeed. Although
the editors and managing editors said mentoring did happen, some said that they wanted
to do more to formalize the process. Margaret also expressed frustration that the bar had
been raised for minority reporters during the hiring process. She felt that in many cases,
chances were not taken on minority reporters. “But somebody had to take a chance on a
white reporter, so why not on a minority reporter?”
Another essential factor in practicing diversity was the diversity training and
discussions that went on in the newsrooms. All of the newspapers had diversity
committees and some had sent reporters to formal diversity training programs. However,
some of the reporters expressed dissatisfaction with how the diversity training and
conversations were implemented and frustration with the lack of support by management
about the training. One important aspect of diversity training at the Knight-Ridder paper,
for Louise (white editor) was to try to show that leaders made decisions based on
experiences and therefore all voices needed to be heard. To her, it was important to
recognize and for staff to recognize that “life experiences will influence what you bring to
the table and how you see things.”
Some of the reporters felt they were ‘forced’ to go to training sessions and,


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.