All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

How the Internet Affects Political Communication of Individuals - A Longitudinal Survey of Onliners and Offliners
Unformatted Document Text:  ICA-6-10602 3 political system. This position has a long tradition throughout the history of research of media effects (Lazarsfeld 1944; Noelle-Neumann 1970, 1974, Norris 2000). But in the context of media effects research we have also positions supposing the opposite: for instance, media-mailaise theory of Robinson (1976) states that media reception may lead to a decline in political interest. Also Patterson (1993) or recently Robert Putnam (2000) focused on negative effects of media on society. Applied to online communication those positions would be in favour of a "hypothesis of exclusion": One could expect increasing fragmentation of societies, growing mistrust and political ignorance following the spread of Internet-based communication. However there is no substantial empirical evidence for that up to now. But with regard to the Internet the opposite position to the hypotheses of inclusion and mobilization is the assumption of a growing "digital divide" – the mobilization of the few and an exclusion of the many. This position gained a lot of interest in the public and particularly among political executives. It does not expect a recession of political interest or activity by large but different effects dependent on socio-demographic variables. The digital divide hypothesis expects that socially and economically well situated people may achieve more by using the internet than people with various disadvantages. Over time this will lead to a growing gap between the "haves" and "have-nots". This position has also a long tradition in communication studies – remember the knowledge gap hypothesis (Donohew/Tipton 1973). Nevertheless all of these three positions emphasize a strong effect of the Internet on political attitudes and activities of citizens. Thus there remains a fourth possible position: the Internet may have no effect in the field of political communication and participation: the „hypothesis of indifference“. These four hypotheses represent the theoretical background of potential political effects of the Internet on a micro-level of analysis. But we may not stop at a simple confrontation of these alternatives; it is necessary to check which hypothesis can claim the highest plausibility. Which substantial changes does the Internet accout for? 2. Research Questions Does the Internet lead to an inclusion in or to a socially selective exclusion from the political system?

Authors: Emmer, Martin. and Vowe, Gerhard.
first   previous   Page 3 of 13   next   last



background image
ICA-6-10602
3
political system. This position has a long tradition throughout the history of research of media
effects (Lazarsfeld 1944; Noelle-Neumann 1970, 1974, Norris 2000).
But in the context of media effects research we have also positions supposing the opposite: for
instance, media-mailaise theory of Robinson (1976) states that media reception may lead to a
decline in political interest. Also Patterson (1993) or recently Robert Putnam (2000) focused
on negative effects of media on society. Applied to online communication those positions
would be in favour of a "hypothesis of exclusion": One could expect increasing fragmentation
of societies, growing mistrust and political ignorance following the spread of Internet-based
communication. However there is no substantial empirical evidence for that up to now.
But with regard to the Internet the opposite position to the hypotheses of inclusion and
mobilization is the assumption of a growing "digital divide" – the mobilization of the few and
an exclusion of the many. This position gained a lot of interest in the public and particularly
among political executives. It does not expect a recession of political interest or activity by
large but different effects dependent on socio-demographic variables. The digital divide
hypothesis expects that socially and economically well situated people may achieve more by
using the internet than people with various disadvantages. Over time this will lead to a
growing gap between the "haves" and "have-nots". This position has also a long tradition in
communication studies – remember the knowledge gap hypothesis (Donohew/Tipton 1973).
Nevertheless all of these three positions emphasize a strong effect of the Internet on political
attitudes and activities of citizens. Thus there remains a fourth possible position: the Internet
may have no effect in the field of political communication and participation: the „hypothesis
of indifference“.
These four hypotheses represent the theoretical background of potential political effects of the
Internet on a micro-level of analysis. But we may not stop at a simple confrontation of these
alternatives; it is necessary to check which hypothesis can claim the highest plausibility.
Which substantial changes does the Internet accout for?
2. Research Questions
Does the Internet lead to an inclusion in or to a socially selective exclusion from the political
system?


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 13   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.